The 1976 film: A Day of Justice has been digitized

Georgetown Law Library’s Digital Initiatives and Special Collections Division recently supported the digitization of A Day of Justice, a 1976 co-presentation by the Legal Services Corporation, the ABA SCLAID and the National Legal Aid and Defender Association.

The film is a remarkable historical document that features photographs and audio recordings documenting scenes from a regular day in legal services offices across the country, including the Legal Aid Society of Cleveland, Ohio, the Taylor Law Center Legal Clinic in Knoxville, Tennessee, the Colorado Rural Legal Services program, the Greater Boston Legal Services program, the Legal Aid Bureau of Baltimore, MD, the Georgia Legal Services Program, the West Virginia Legal Services Plan, DNA Legal Services, Inc., and the National Housing and Economic Development Law Project in Berkeley, California.

 

Screen shot from A Day of Justice (1976), showing the staff of the Legal Aid Bureau of Baltimore, MD at a meeting, including Charles Dorsey.

Most of the cases were actual situations, filmed with permission of the participants. Some scenes were recreated by request of the lawyers involved. In all events, each sequence accurately reflected the work in legal services offices in the mid 1970s.

The film incorporates photographs and narrated conversations with clients, attorneys, paralegals and staff at the different offices.

Screenshot from A Day of Justice (1976) showing a scene at the Taylor Law Center Legal Clinic in Knoxville, Tennessee.

Harriet Wilson Ellis was the executive producer, and Ronald Capaleces produced, directed and wrote the film.

Please contact the NEJL Archivist for access to the digitized film.

Richard Zorza on the Future of Access to Justice: An Oral History Interview Segment

On October 25, 2017, Alan Houseman interviewed Richard Zorza on behalf of the National Equal Justice Library Oral History Project.

Richard Zorza posted a segment from the interview on his Access to Justice blog. In the segment, which comes at the end of the interview, he offers this perspective on the future of access to justice.

You can access the interview here: https://accesstojustice.net/2017/11/03/oral-history-interview-fragment-future-of-access-to-justice/

Web pages documenting the histories of legal aid and defender organizations in the United States (permalinks)

Please check out NEJL’s collection of permalinks to web pages documenting the histories of legal aid and defender organizations in the United States.

Please contact the NEJL archivist if you suggest to add additional pages to this collection.

 

 

Compilation of selected overviews of history and organization of legal aid and indigent defense in the U.S. and internationally

Check out NEJL’s short list of selected overviews of the history and organization of legal aid and indigent defense in the United States and internationally.

The list was originally compiled for a program for the State Department’s International Visitor Leadership Program.

 

 

Please help the NEJL with photo identification from 1968 Conference on Welfare Law in New Orleans

NEJL photo identification project

We are hoping to identify the speakers featured in these contact sheets from the 1968 Conference on Welfare Law, held at the Jung Hotel in New Orleans, Louisiana, September 27-28, 1968.

If you can identify one or more of the people in the photographs, please email or call the NEJL Archivist: 202-662-4043. Or email: kh781@law.georgetown.edu.

The photographs are from the National Institute for Education in Law and Poverty (NIELP) collection, which Thomas Buckley donated to the NEJL.

Thank you!

 

50 Years Ago, the First Class of Reggies Completed Their Training at the University of Pennsylvania

Fifty years ago, in August of 1967, the first group of fifty fellows from the Reginald Heber Smith Community Lawyer Fellowship Program (RHS), completed their training to start their assignments at local legal services programs across the United States. Among the first class of Reggies were Dan Bradley, who became the second President of the Legal Services Corporation, Cordell Meeks, Jr., who later became the first African-American judge in Kansas City, Henry Freedman, who became the director of the Center for Social Welfare Policy and Law (later: NCLEJ), David Diamond, the chief welfare attorney and later head of the Law Reform and Test Case Unit at the Mobilization for Youth, Robert Bennett, who became Northwestern University School of Law dean, George Ranney, who became the Executive VP of Inland Steel and Elizabeth Evans Neely, a pioneer in Georgia’s legal community, who co-founded the statewide program to provide legal services to low-income clients.

First class of Reginald Heber Smith Fellows at the summer training session, University of Pennsylvania Law School. August 1967, shortly to dispatch to their assignments in local legal services agencies around the country. Photo donated by Henry Freedman. NEJL photo collection.

During the first summer course in 1967, Tony Amsterdam taught civil procedure. James Freedman, who became the president of Dartmouth College, taught education law and Ed Sparer taught welfare law for a week, recalls Henry Freedman in a 2013 oral history for the NEJL.

The RHS program was established in order to attract talented young lawyers to the field of poverty law. Initially sponsored by the Legal Services Program within the Office of Economic Opportunity and administered by the University of Pennsylvania, it recruited recent law school graduates, trained them in various aspects of poverty law, and placed them in regional legal services projects throughout the country. The program was named for Reginald Heber Smith, author of Justice and the Poor (1919).

Inspired by the civil and economic rights movements and committed to their cause, the Reggies made an immediate impact upon the regional and local projects where they were placed. After two years, in 1969, the Program was moved from the University of Pennsylvania to Howard University where greater emphasis was placed on attracting minority Fellows. When OEO was dismantled in the mid-1970’s, the Reggie Program moved to the Legal Services Corporation. From 1967 to 1985, when the program ended, there were approximately 2,000 Reggies. Many went on to have careers in legal services, become educators, judges, and prominent lawyers.

The NEJL houses the Reginald Heber Smith Community Lawyer Program Collection (NEJL 049), which was created in preparation for the Thirtieth Anniversary Reunion of Reggies in 1998, sponsored by the NEJL. Part of the collection is a roster of former Reggies, compiled by Clint Bamberger. The NEJL oral history collection also includes many interviews with former Reggies.

Katharina Hering

Please help the NEJL with photo identification from 1968 Conference on Welfare Law in NYC, part 3

NEJL photo identification project

We are hoping to identify the speakers featured in these contact sheets from the 1968 Conference on Welfare Law, held at Columbia University, New York, NY, November 7-9, 1968.

If you can identify one or more of the people in the photographs, please email or call the NEJL Archivist: 202-662-4043. Or email: kh781@law.georgetown.edu.

The photographs are from the National Institute for Education in Law and Poverty (NIELP) collection, which Thomas Buckley donated to the NEJL.

Thank you!

Please help the NEJL with photo identification from 1968 Conference on Welfare Law in NYC, part 2

NEJL photo identification project

We are hoping to identify the speakers featured in these contact sheets from the 1968 Conference on Welfare Law, held at Columbia University, New York, NY, November 7-9, 1968.

If you can identify one or more of the people in the photographs, please email or call the NEJL Archivist: 202-662-4043. Or email: kh781@law.georgetown.edu.

The photographs are from the National Institute for Education in Law and Poverty (NIELP) collection, which Thomas Buckley donated to the NEJL.

Thank you!

Please help the NEJL with photo identification from 1968 Conference on Welfare Law in NYC, part 1

NEJL photo identification project:

We are hoping to identify the speakers featured in these five photographs from the 1968 Conference on Welfare Law, held at Columbia University, New York, NY, November 7-9, 1968.

If you can identify one or more of the people in the photographs, please email or call the NEJL Archivist: 202-662-4043. Or email: kh781@law.georgetown.edu.

The photographs are from the National Institute for Education in Law and Poverty (NIELP) collection, which Thomas Buckley donated to the NEJL.

Thank you!

Photo from the 1968 Conference on Welfare Law, held at Columbia University, NYC, Nov. 7-9, 1968, NIELP-Thomas Buckley Collection, NEJL 071, Georgetown Law Library.