Please help the NEJL with photo identification from 1968 Conference on Welfare Law in New Orleans

NEJL photo identification project

We are hoping to identify the speakers featured in these contact sheets from the 1968 Conference on Welfare Law, held at the Jung Hotel in New Orleans, Louisiana, September 27-28, 1968.

If you can identify one or more of the people in the photographs, please email or call the NEJL Archivist: 202-662-4043. Or email: kh781@law.georgetown.edu.

The photographs are from the National Institute for Education in Law and Poverty (NIELP) collection, which Thomas Buckley donated to the NEJL.

Thank you!

 

50 Years Ago, the First Class of Reggies Completed Their Training at the University of Pennsylvania

Fifty years ago, in August of 1967, the first group of fifty fellows from the Reginald Heber Smith Community Lawyer Fellowship Program (RHS), completed their training to start their assignments at local legal services programs across the United States. Among the first class of Reggies were Dan Bradley, who became the second President of the Legal Services Corporation, Cordell Meeks, Jr., who later became the first African-American judge in Kansas City, Henry Freedman, who became the director of the Center for Social Welfare Policy and Law (later: NCLEJ), David Diamond, the chief welfare attorney and later head of the Law Reform and Test Case Unit at the Mobilization for Youth, Robert Bennett, who became Northwestern University School of Law dean, George Ranney, who became the Executive VP of Inland Steel and Elizabeth Evans Neely, a pioneer in Georgia’s legal community, who co-founded the statewide program to provide legal services to low-income clients.

First class of Reginald Heber Smith Fellows at the summer training session, University of Pennsylvania Law School. August 1967, shortly to dispatch to their assignments in local legal services agencies around the country. Photo donated by Henry Freedman. NEJL photo collection.

During the first summer course in 1967, Tony Amsterdam taught civil procedure. James Freedman, who became the president of Dartmouth College, taught education law and Ed Sparer taught welfare law for a week, recalls Henry Freedman in a 2013 oral history for the NEJL.

The RHS program was established in order to attract talented young lawyers to the field of poverty law. Initially sponsored by the Legal Services Program within the Office of Economic Opportunity and administered by the University of Pennsylvania, it recruited recent law school graduates, trained them in various aspects of poverty law, and placed them in regional legal services projects throughout the country. The program was named for Reginald Heber Smith, author of Justice and the Poor (1919).

Inspired by the civil and economic rights movements and committed to their cause, the Reggies made an immediate impact upon the regional and local projects where they were placed. After two years, in 1969, the Program was moved from the University of Pennsylvania to Howard University where greater emphasis was placed on attracting minority Fellows. When OEO was dismantled in the mid-1970’s, the Reggie Program moved to the Legal Services Corporation. From 1967 to 1985, when the program ended, there were approximately 2,000 Reggies. Many went on to have careers in legal services, become educators, judges, and prominent lawyers.

The NEJL houses the Reginald Heber Smith Community Lawyer Program Collection (NEJL 049), which was created in preparation for the Thirtieth Anniversary Reunion of Reggies in 1998, sponsored by the NEJL. Part of the collection is a roster of former Reggies, compiled by Clint Bamberger. The NEJL oral history collection also includes many interviews with former Reggies.

Katharina Hering

Please help the NEJL with photo identification from 1968 Conference on Welfare Law in NYC, part 3

NEJL photo identification project

We are hoping to identify the speakers featured in these contact sheets from the 1968 Conference on Welfare Law, held at Columbia University, New York, NY, November 7-9, 1968.

If you can identify one or more of the people in the photographs, please email or call the NEJL Archivist: 202-662-4043. Or email: kh781@law.georgetown.edu.

The photographs are from the National Institute for Education in Law and Poverty (NIELP) collection, which Thomas Buckley donated to the NEJL.

Thank you!

Please help the NEJL with photo identification from 1968 Conference on Welfare Law in NYC, part 2

NEJL photo identification project

We are hoping to identify the speakers featured in these contact sheets from the 1968 Conference on Welfare Law, held at Columbia University, New York, NY, November 7-9, 1968.

If you can identify one or more of the people in the photographs, please email or call the NEJL Archivist: 202-662-4043. Or email: kh781@law.georgetown.edu.

The photographs are from the National Institute for Education in Law and Poverty (NIELP) collection, which Thomas Buckley donated to the NEJL.

Thank you!

Please help the NEJL with photo identification from 1968 Conference on Welfare Law in NYC, part 1

NEJL photo identification project:

We are hoping to identify the speakers featured in these five photographs from the 1968 Conference on Welfare Law, held at Columbia University, New York, NY, November 7-9, 1968.

If you can identify one or more of the people in the photographs, please email or call the NEJL Archivist: 202-662-4043. Or email: kh781@law.georgetown.edu.

The photographs are from the National Institute for Education in Law and Poverty (NIELP) collection, which Thomas Buckley donated to the NEJL.

Thank you!

Photo from the 1968 Conference on Welfare Law, held at Columbia University, NYC, Nov. 7-9, 1968, NIELP-Thomas Buckley Collection, NEJL 071, Georgetown Law Library.

Please help the NEJL with photo identification!

The historical materials from the National Institute for Education in Law and Poverty (NIELP), which Thomas Buckley donated to the NEJL this spring, include a number of interesting photographs from NIELP sponsored conferences from the late 1960s.

We are asking for your help with identifying the speakers featured in these photographs, and will be regularly posting different photographs on this blog. If you can identify one or more of the people in the photographs, please email or call the NEJL Archivist: 202-662-4043. Or email: kh781@law.georgetown.edu.

Below is the first photo from the 1968 Conference on Welfare Law, held at George Washington University, National Law Center, Washington, DC, May 9-11, 1968.

It is possible that the photo documents a panel about: Welfare Rights Organizations and Group Representation.

nejl071_nielp_welfare_law_1968_panel

Photo from the 1968 Conference on Welfare Law, held at George Washington University, National Law Center, Washington, DC, May 9-11, 1968. NIELP-Thomas Buckley Collection, NEJL 071, Georgetown Law Library.

Thank you for your help!

 

 

 

In re Gault Research Portal

50 years ago today, on May 15, 1967, Supreme Court Associate Justice Abe Fortas delivered the landmark United States Supreme Court opinion in Application of Paul and Marjorie Gault, 387 U.S. 1 (1967), which held that juveniles accused of crimes in a delinquency proceeding must be afforded many of the same due process rights as adults, such as the right to counsel, the right to confront witnesses, the right against forced self-incrimination, and the right to maintain a record of the proceedings.

case_file_116_543-768x576

Source: Record Group 267: Records of the Supreme Court of the United States, 1772 – 2007 Series: Appellate Jurisdiction Case Files, 1792 – 2010, File Unit: Case File 116, October Term 1966, In Re Gault. The link to the catalog record for the digitized case file can be found in the “archival materials” section of the research portal.

To mark in re Gault @ 50, we have launched a new research portal that offers links to archival materials documenting the case, as well as references to selected scholarship analyzing the history of the case and the state of due process in juvenile court.

Related NEJL materials: Oral history interview with Marshall Hartman, who co-authored the amicus curiae brief for the National Legal Aid and Defender Association. The other authors of the NLADA brief were L. Michael Getty and James Doherty. The NEJL also holds the James Doherty Papers.

Marshall Hartman receives Illinois State Bar Association’s Laureate Award

Marshall Hartman, one of the founders and former president of the CNEJL, has received the Illinois State Bar Association’s Laureate Award.

More information and a biographical summary can be found at the Illinois State Bar Association’s website: https://www.isba.org/awards/laureates/2017

The 1990 NEJL oral history interview with Marshall Hartman, conducted by James Neuhard, can be accessed through Digital Georgetown:

https://repository.library.georgetown.edu/handle/10822/711826

Congratulations, Marshall!

 

 

Materials from the National Institute for Education in Law and Poverty donated to the NEJL

Thomas Buckley, a retired professor from the Cleveland-Marshall College of Law, donated his collection of materials from the National Institute for Education in Law and Poverty (NIELP) to the NEJL. Thomas Buckley served as the Deputy Director of the NIELP from 1967-1971. The director was Craig W. Christensen. The Institute was established in 1967 at Northwestern University School of Law to develop and implement an educational program for Legal Service attorneys. The goal wnielpas to go beyond serving “individual clients with individual problems,” and train lawyers as advocates to address systemic issues of poverty and “make new law on behalf of the poor,” writes Buckley. Welfare law and consumer law weren’t even taught at law schools at the time, and the training programs document the dynamic development of these areas of law at the time. The collection includes materials from the 1968 Conference on Welfare Law and materials on the Uniform Consumer Credit Code, prepared by the National Consumer Law Center in 1969.

Thomas Buckley graduated from Fordham University (1958) and from Yale Law School (1961). Prior to joining NIELP in 1967, he was a Visiting Professor at the School of Law at Boston University Law School (1966-1967) and an Assistant Professor of Law at the University of North Dakota School of Law (1964-1966). From 1961-1964, he was an Associate at Carter, Ledyard & Milburn in NYC. Buckley joined the faculty at Cleveland-Marshall College of Law in 1971.