Oct 30 2008

World Map of Flickr Privacy Settings

by at 2:14 am

World Map of Flickr Privacy Settings

TechCrunch and ReadWriteWeb have written about a slide shared by Yahoo!’s Principal Research Scientist Elizabeth Churchill on geographical locations where Flickr users are more likely to post their photos with privacy settings (red) or use the default public setting (green). The sample set was 1 million Flickr users who self-reported their locations, in 2005.

Neither Michael Arrington nor Marshall Kirkpatrick share any details of the methodology behind the map, but a quick Google search led me to the presentation from which this slide seems to be taken: ‘Sharing Preferences and Privacy Cultures‘. The presentation itself is based on a paper by Elizabeth Churchill and Shyong K. Lam titled ‘The Social Web: Global Village or Private Cliques?’ The paper is behind a firewall but the presentation gives some more data about the research —

– More than 90% of users younger than 25 post their photos as public. In the 25 to 40 age group, public photo sharing behavior drops, almost in s straight line, to 80% and goes as low as 70% for users in their late 50s and early 60s.

– Public photo sharing behavior follows a S curve when mapped against the number of contacts: it first decreases between 0 to 10 contacts, then increases with the number of contacts to go beyond 90% for more than 30 odd contacts.

– In the world map itself, there are at least five gradations from green to red. It seems that pure red means that about 70% of the users share their photos publicly whereas green means that about 90% of the users share their photos publicly. Since no information is available for the methodology behind the world map, I can only conclude that users in America, Brazil and Russia have a higher tendency to share their photos publicly than users in India, China or Europe.

The conclusion that Indians are more concerned about online privacy than Brazilians and Americans further complicates my research on attitudes towards online privacy in BRIC countries. Another research by Synovate showed that Brazilians and Americans are more concerned about online privacy than Indians, whereas my own understanding is that both Brazilians and Indians are much less concerned about online privacy than Americans.

No responses yet | Categories: 2008-09 Fellows,Brazil,BRIC,China,Gaurav Mishra,India,Privacy,Russia,Social Media | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Oct 22 2008

Social Network World Map: Why Do Indians & Brazilians Love Orkut?

by at 2:18 pm

Here’s the latest world map of social networks based on Alexa data (via Oxyweb) —

World Map of Social Networks 2008

— and Indian and Brazil are the only two countries in the world where Orkut is the most popular social network.

I have often wondered what joins Brazilians and Indians in their love for Orkut. The answer is a combination of serendipity, first mover advantage, faster loading time, simplicity of the name, similarity of the name to Hindi/ Portuguese sounds, simplicity of the user interface, and association with the Google brand name, but the most powerful reason is the lax attitude towards privacy common to Indians and Brazilians. Continue Reading »

No responses yet | Categories: 2008-09 Fellows,Brazil,Gaurav Mishra,India,Privacy,Social Media | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Oct 12 2008

Modeling Transparency, Openness, and Privacy

by at 11:22 am

Since I am specifically studying what the internet will look like within the BRIC countries in terms of privacy, openness, and transparency, I thought it would be best to lay out a matrix of those three phases plotted versus five key social spheres, which maybe I could call “accountability arenas”.  Since there’s no good way to insert a matrix here without using SlideShare or an image, I’ll just list the results here:

Privacy

  • Personal: Libertarianism, isolationism, anonymity
  • Sexual: Don’t ask, don’t tell
  • Health: Non-contagion/non-preventative care
  • Financial: Shadow market pools, corruption
  • Political: Weak communities, divided citizens, big money interests, oligarchy

Continue Reading »

No responses yet | Categories: 2008-09 Fellows,Ben Turner,Privacy | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Oct 05 2008

Danah Boyd on Social Networking and Values

by at 10:43 pm

Danah Boyd, a digital ethnographer who was recently hired by Microsoft Research New England to study online social networks, posted a much-publicized essay last year about how she perceived there to be class divisions between the userbases of Facebook and Myspace.  This essay was entitled “Viewing American class divisions through Facebook and MySpace”.

Since part of my research is about whether different cultures and countries will use the internet differently, based on their values, rituals, and customs, it would be important for me to make sure that there indeed is a potential for people to express those key differences by selecting a different social networking site online versus others.  Some would argue that behavior online is converging on universal behavior (generally:  feedback loops, transparency, collaboration), but I think cultures will retain their identities even after buying into the online revolution. Continue Reading »

6 responses so far | Categories: 2008-09 Fellows,Ben Turner,Privacy | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Sep 26 2008

Clay Shirky Says Privacy Has Been a Convenience of Inconvenience

by at 12:38 pm

Clay Shirky, one of the foremost thinkers regarding the social web and the cognitive surplus, recently gave a talk at the Web 2.0 Conference in NYC about information overload.

Continue Reading »

One response so far | Categories: 2008-09 Fellows,Ben Turner,Privacy,Social Media | Tags: , , , , , ,

Sep 14 2008

Google DC Event on Cloud Computing

by at 4:18 pm

On Friday, September 12th, Google DC held a talk on cloud computing in its New York Avenue location in downtown Washington, DC.  Specifically, the event discussed a new study by the Pew Internet and American Life Project on “Use of Cloud Computing Applications and Services”.

Moderated by John B. Horrigan, director of the Pew Internet and American Life Project, the talk included

  • Dan Burton, Senior Vice President, Global Public Policy, Salesforce.com
  • Mike Nelson, Visiting Professor, The Center for Communication, Culture, and Technology, Georgetown University
  • Ari Schwartz, Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, Center for Democracy and Technology

Here is a brief write-up of the event.

Cloud computing is basically the offloading of data from individual computers loosely linked to the internet, to a network of computers specifically maintained and interfaced so that people can access that data from any electronic device anywhere in the world. Continue Reading »

2 responses so far | Categories: 2008-09 Fellows,Ben Turner,Privacy | Tags: , , , , ,

Sep 10 2008

Americans’ Attitudes on Digital Footprints (Pew Internet & American Life Project)

by at 2:07 pm

I wanted to get more information about “online culture” within the US, since it is still, at least for now, the standard for what an online society looks like in terms of debating privacy versus openness, online presence, and reputation.

In December 2007, the Pew Internet & American Life Project released the findings from its surveys on “digital footprints” and “online identity management and search in the age of transparency”.  You can read the full report (PDF) online, and the questionnaire they used, as well.

It is interesting to study the attitudes versus the actions of social networking users when it comes to privacy versus openness.  The study found that “[m]ost internet users are not concerned about the amount of information available about them online, and most do not take steps to limit that information.” Continue Reading »

No responses yet | Categories: 2008-09 Fellows,Ben Turner,Social Media | Tags: , , , , , ,

Sep 06 2008

Why Are Brazilians More Concerned About Online Privacy and Security Than Indians?

by at 9:41 pm

Here are some highlights from a survey conducted by research firm Synovate amongst 13,000 respondents aged 18-65 in Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, South Africa, Taiwan, the United Arab Emirates (UAE) and the US (via eMarketer) —

– Only 42% of the respondents knew about social networking, even though a higher percentage of younger respondents were aware of social networking.

– Only 26% of the respondents were members of any social network. Some markets (like India) seemed to favor multiple memberships and some seemed to stick to one or two major ones.

– 51% of the respondents expressed concerns about privacy and security issues online. Brazilians (79%) and Americans (69%) were most concerned about such issues while Indians (19%) were the least concerned. Amongst members of social networking sites, only 26% were comfortable giving out personal details. Indians (57%) were amongst those most comfortable sharing personal details while Brazilians (23%) and Americans (30%) were amongst those least comfortable. Continue Reading »

2 responses so far | Categories: 2008-09 Fellows,Brazil,Culture,Gaurav Mishra,India,Social Media | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Sep 04 2008

Online Cultural Values of Openness and Privacy

by at 3:32 pm

Hi, I’m Ben Turner and this is my introductory post. I’m one of the two junior Yahoo! fellows working with Gaurav this year. I am a second-year Master of Science in Foreign Service candidate studying international development, technology policy, and social business entrepreneurship. I am a former US Army veteran of Iraq and have worked as a web designer and a daytrader as well.

I have a personal web site at http://benturner.com/ and my online activities are streamed through FriendFeed. Please feel free to add me!

Research Topic

My research will focus on the relationship between openness and privacy (and transparency, which I consider to be a product of that interaction). My feeling is that there are different expectations and standards for openness and privacy, depending on which cultural sphere you analyze them in; for example, what the online community finds value in is at odds with what the offline community wants. Online and offline values can also vary across cultures and countries: Brazil, Russia, India, China, and the US are all sliding into different models with different priorities for social networking, expression of ideas, velocity of online business transactions, and so on. Continue Reading »

3 responses so far | Categories: 2008-09 Fellows,Ben Turner,Culture,Social Media | Tags: , ,