May 10 2009

The 4Cs Social Media Framework

by at 1:52 pm

The 4Cs Social Media Framework

The Need for the 4Cs Social Media Framework

Over the last year, I have had to explain how social media works to diplomats, defense officials, and academics and students focused on fields as diverse as international affairs, management and sociology.

I have found that first-timer find social media confusing because of two reasons.

The first reason is the excessive focus on specific social media tools. Many first-timers are introduced to social media via specific tools. Many ‘social media experts’ who are practitioners rather than thinkers also focus on specific tools. Since social media encompasses many different types of tools, and each tool has specific characteristics and a steep learning curve, a toolkit approach can quickly become overwhelming. Blogging (WordPress), microblogging (Twitter), video-sharing (YouTube), photo-sharing (Flickr), podcasting (Blog Talk Radio), mapping (Google Maps), social networking (Facebook), social voting (Digg), social bookmarking (Delicious), lifestreaming (Friendfeed), wikis (Wikipedia), and virtual worlds (Second Life) are all quite different from each other and new and hybrid tools are being introduced almost everyday. Mastering each tool individually seems like a lot of work and a lot of people give up even before they begin.

The second reason is a clear definition of what social media is, even within the social media community. Different thinkers and practitioners use different terms to describe similar tools and practices. Terms like social media, digital media, new media, citizen media, participatory media, peer-to-peer media, social web, participatory web, peer-to-peer web, read write web, social computing, social software, web 2.0, and even crowdsourcing and wikinomics can mean similar or slightly different things depending upon who is using it. Journalists, marketers, entrepreneurs, venture capitalists, software vendors and academics approach the space from their own perspectives and have their own preferred terms. Used precisely, these terms can mean very different things. However, very few people use these terms precisely and almost nobody agrees on the exact definition of these terms.

The 4Cs Social Media Framework

My own approach to social media is both tool-agnostic and terminology-agnostic. So, I use the term social media to encompass all the tools and all the practices that are described by the terms I mentioned above.

Instead of getting distracted by the tools and the terminologies, I focus on the four underlying themes in social media, the 4Cs of social media: Content, Collaboration, Community and Collective Intelligence. Taken together, these four themes constitute the value system of social media. I believe that the tools are transient, the buzzwords will change, but the value system embedded in these 4Cs is here to stay. So, let’s look at these 4Cs in some detail.

The First C: Content

The first C, Content, refers to the idea that social media tools allow everyone to become a creator, by making the publishing and distribution of multimedia content both free and easy, even for amateurs.

User generated content, and the hope of monetizing it through advertising, is at the core of the business model of almost all social media platforms. User generated content is also at the core of citizen journalism, the notion that amateur users can perform journalist-like functions (accidentally or otherwise) by reporting and commenting on news. Citizen journalists have repeatedly emerged as critical in crisis reporting and several citizen journalist platforms have emerged to harness their potential to report hyper-local news.

However, just because everyone can become a creator doesn’t mean that everyone does. Most users prefer to consume user generated content, by reading blog, watching videos, or browsing through photos. Some user curate user generated content, by tagging it on social bookmarking websites, voting for it on social voting websites, commenting on it, or linking to it. Researcher have found support for the 1:9:90 rule in many different contexts. The 1:9:90 rule says that 90% of all users are consumers, 9% of all users are curators and only 1% of the users are creators.

The Second C: Collaboration

The second C, Collaboration, refers to the idea that social media facilitates the aggregation of small individual actions into meaningful collective results.

Collaboration can happen at three levels: conversation, co-creation and collective action.

As consumers and curators engage with compelling content, the content becomes the center of conversations. Conversations create buzz, which is how ideas tip, become viral. Many social media practitioners who are from a marketing or public relations background are focused on creating conversations.

However, some of us recognize that conversations are a mere stepping stone for co-creation. In co-creation, the value lies as much in the curated aggregate as in the individual contributions. Wikis are a perfect example of co-creation. Open group blogs, photo pools, video collages and similar projects are also good examples of co-creation.

Collective action goes one step further and uses online engagement to initiate meaningful action. Collective action can take the form of signing online petitions, fundraising, tele-calling, or organizing an offline protest or event.

Even though conversations, co-creation and collective action are different forms of collaboration, the difficulty in collaborating increases dramatically as we move from conversations to co-creation to collective action. The key is to start with a big task, break it down into individual actions (modularity) that are really small (granularity), and then put them together into a whole without losing value (aggregating mechanism). It is also important to bridge online conversations into mainstream media buzz and online engagement into offline action.

The Third C: Community

The third C, Community, refers to the idea that social media facilitates sustained collaboration around a shared idea, over time and often across space.

The notion of a community is really tricky because every web page is a latent community, waiting to be activated. A vibrant community has size and strength, and is built around a meaningful social object.

Most people understand that a community that has a large number of members (size) who have strong relationships and frequent interactions with each other (strength) is better than a community which doesn’t. However, a community is more than the sum total of its members and their relationships.

People don’t build relationships with each other in a vacuum. A vibrant community is built around a social object that is meaningful for its members. The social object can be a person, a place, a thing or an idea. The Netroots community is built around progressive politics in America. The My Barack Obama community was built around Barack Obama’s presidential campaign. The Obama Girl community was built around a series of videos Amber Lee Ettinger made to support Obama’s campaign. Sometimes, choosing the right social object can be crucial for building a vibrant community. HP can choose to build a community around printers, printing, or corporate careers, all of which will have very different characteristics.

The Fourth C: Collective Intelligence

The fourth C, Collective Intelligence, refers to the idea that the social web enables us to not only aggregate individual actions, but also run sophisticated algorithms on them and extract meaning from them.

Collective intelligence can be based on both implicit and explicit actions and often takes the form of reputation and recommendation systems. Google extracts the pagerank, a measure of how important a page is, from our (implicit) linking and clicking behavior. Amazon and Netflix are able to offer us recommendations based on our (implicit) browsing, (implicit) buying and (explicit) rating behavior and comparing it to the behavior of other people like us. eBay and Amazon assign ratings to sellers and reviewers respectively, based on whether other members in the community had a good experience with them. On the day of the 2008 US elections, the Obama campaign was able to assign trimmed down telecalling lists to volunteers by ticking off the names of the people who had already voted.

The great thing about collective intelligence is that it becomes easier to extract meaning from a community as the size and strength of the community grow. If the collective intelligence is then shared back with the community, the members find more value in the community, and the community grows even more, leading to a virtuous cycle.

The4Cs Social Media Framework in Summary

So, the 4Cs form a hierarchy of what is possible with social media. As we move from Content to Collaboration to Community to Collective Intelligence, it becomes increasingly difficult to both observe these layers and activate them. Also each layer is often, but not always, a pre-requisite for the next layer. Compelling content is a pre-requisite for meaningful collaboration, which is a pre-requisite for a vibrant community, which, in turn, is a pre-requisite for collective intelligence.

Although I designed the 4Cs framework to explain how I see social media, I have also found it to be a useful tools to evaluate specific social media initiatives. The best social media initiatives leverage all these four layers, but I have seen that most initiatives get stuck between the Collaboration and Community layers. Examples of social media initiatives that leverage the Community or Collective Intelligence layers are few and far between. It’s important to note, however, that each layer is valuable in itself, and it’s OK to design an initiative to only exploit the Content or Collaboration layers.

The 4Cs Social Media Framework Applied to Digital Activism

Let me explain what I just said my applying the 4Cs framework to digital activism initiatives.

Many digital activism initiatives like Social Documentary and Witness primarily focus on using social media tools to create and share compelling multimedia Content. Some of this Content generates Conversations and becomes viral and some of it might even lead to Collective Action. However, the focus is on Content.

Other initiatives, like Vote Report India or the Pink Chaddi Campaign, start off with a strong focus on Collaboration around a specific event. In its first iteration, Vote Report India leveraged Co-creation by creating a platform for collectively tracking irregularities in the 2009 Indian elections. The Pink Chaddi Campaign leveraged Collective Action by asking its supporters to send pink panties to the Sri Ram Sena as Valentine’s Day gifts. As these campaigns become successful, they try to move to the next Community level, but don’t always succeed in building a long-term community.

Very few digital activism initiatives are able to leverage the Community or Collective Intelligence layers. The Netroots community in the US, especially Daily Kos, Talking Points Memo and MoveOn.org, have been able to build a strong Community around progressive politics in the US. My Barack Obama leverage some aspects of Collective Intelligence during the 2008 presidential campaign.

What About You?

If you are a social media practitioner or a digital activist focused on the Content and Collaboration layers, I would urge you to think about how you can move to the Community layer. If you already run a vibrant community, I would urge you to think about introducing reputation and recommendation systems in it and leverage the Collective Intelligence layer.

If you are designing a new social media initiative, I would urge you to use the 4Cs Framework in the design and strategy phase itself. Perhaps, in phase one, you would want to start with a campaign built around Content and focused on Collaboration, with elements of co-creation and/ or collective action. You would do well to plan for a phase two which is focused on Community, with a dash of Collective Intelligence built in. The question you want to ask yourself, then, is: how can I design a Collaboration based campaign so that it can be used to build a long-term Community?

If you are a journalist, analyst or academic in the business of understanding social media initiatives, you’ll find the 4Cs Framework really useful. What are the boundary conditions needed to succeed at each layer? What are the boundary conditions needed to move from Content to Collaboration, from Collaboration to Community, and from Community to Collective Intelligence? Can you think of other digital activism or social media initiatives that leverage the Community or Collective Intelligence layers?

Do share your thoughts.

Cross-posted at Gauravonomics, my blog on social media and social change.

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Feb 25 2009

Hindi Blogosphere’s Reactions to the Pink Chaddi Campaign Show the Divide Between Bharat and India

by at 11:51 pm

As I wrote my analysis of the Valentine’s Day Pink Chaddi Campaign, I realized that it only appealed to the small minority of well-to-do, urban, English-speaking men and women in India who are amused by the irony of a woman being called ‘Pubgoing, Loose, and Forward’ in the same sentence. It also self-consciously distanced itself from the Indian mainstream which still wants its Bollywood heroines to be virginal and associates ‘Pubgoing, Loose, and Forward Women’ with the Bollywood vamps of yesteryears. The choice of sending pink panties to Shri Ram Sena further reinforced this self-consciously us versus them positioning.

I had earlier done a roundup of the discussions on the Pink Chaddi Campaign in the English language news media and the English blogosphere in India. To prove my hypothesis, I decided to test the limits of my Hindi and do a roundup of the discussions on the Pink Chaddi Campaign in the Hindi language news media and the Hindi blogosphere in India. I haven’t been able to search for Hindi news stories on the campaign, but the discussion on Hindi blogs did support my hypothesis.

In the English blogosphere in India, the discussion was dominated by supporters of the campaign who went on the offensive, while the detractors were mostly reacting to them. The discussion here was dominated by outrage against the Shri Ram Sena and appreciation of the campaign’s creativity.

In the Hindi blogosphere, the roles were reversed. Detractors of the Pink Chaddi Campaign were on the offensive here, forcing the supporters of the campaign on the defensive. The discussion here was dominated by the irrelevance and indignity of the campaign and the shamelessness of the women supporting it.

Suresh Chiplunkar and Sarthi set the tone for the discussion with strong posts against the campaign.

Sarthi emerged as one of the strongest critics of the Pink Chaddi campaign and wrote a series of posts to support his perspective —

कुछ लोगों ने अभियान चला दिया है कि तीव्रवादियों को गुलाबी चड्डियां भेजी जायें, वह भी चड्डी का मर्दाना नहीं नारियाना वेराईटी. सवाल यह है कि जिस देश में चोलीजांघिये का सरे आम प्रदर्शन करना भद्र लोगों के लिये अच्छा नहीं समझा जाता वहां ये लोग नवजवानों को क्या सिखा रहे हैं.

गुलाबी (या किसी और रंग की) चड्डियां भेजने से समाज का कोई फायदा नहीं होगा, न ही स्त्रियों को सामूहिक तौर पर को शराब पीने की आजादी मिल जायेगी, लेकिन मूर्खों द्वारा इस अभियान के लिये लाखों नारियाना अधोवस्त्र खरीदे जाने से चड्डी के निर्माता जरूर तर जायेंगे. क्या मालूम कहीं यह चड्डी-आंदोलन उन में से ही किसी की करतूत तो नहीं है? (link)

Some people have started a campaign to send pink underwear to the radicals, and that too of the female, not the male, variety. The question is: in a country where public display of undergarments is not considered right for decent people, what are these people trying to teach the youngsters?

Sending pink panties won’t help the society, nor will women get the freedom to drink alcohol, but the foolish people who will buy women’s undergarments for this campaign will certainly help the manufacturers of panties. Is it possible that they are responsible for the panty campaign? (link)

मामले को समझने के लिये सबसे पहले तो आलोच्य चिट्ठे के नाम और उस के भावार्थ को जरा देख लें. वे खुद साफ साफ बता रही हैं कि यह चिट्ठा “शराबखानों को आबाद करने वाली, नैतिकता को तिलांजली देने वाली चालू (या छिछोरी)” स्त्रियों का चिट्ठा है एवं इसे अपने इस जीवनशैली को एक प्रगतिशील कदम मानते हैं.

जो जनानियां अपने चिट्ठे पर अपने आप को चालू या छिछोरी बता रही हैं और जो जनानियां लोगों से पराये पुरुषों को अपने जांघिये भिजवा रही हैं, संस्कृति का संरक्षण तो उनके हाथ कतई भी नहीं छोडा जा सकता है क्योंकि इन लोगों का मिशन सिर्फ तब पूरा होगा जब जब हिन्दुस्तान की हर स्त्री इनके समान ही “प्रगतिवादी” और छिछोरी चिंतन की न हो जायें.

हमारी मां, बेटी, बहुओं को इस “प्रगतिवाद” की जरूरत नहीं है!! उनके अधोवस्त्र जहां रहने चाहिये वहीं रहेंगे. सभ्य परिवारों में ये नुमाइश की चीजें नहीं हैं — अत: न तो उनकी नुमाइश होगी, न ही पराये पुरुषों को भेजे जायेंगे. (link)

To understand this issue you should first look at the name of the blog in question and its meaning. They are saying themselves that the blog is for women who frequent pubs and have let go of their characters. And, yet, they consider their lifestyle a progressive step.

Those women who are calling themselves loose and characterless on their blog and asking women to send their panties to unknown men will consider themselves successful only when every woman in India becomes “progressive” and characterless like them. We can’t leave our culture in their hands.

Our mothers, daughters and daughters-in-law don’t need this “progressiveness”! Their undergarments will stay where they ought to stay. They will neither be displayed nor sent to unknown men. (link)

पढेलिखे परिवारों के वे जवान लोग जो नियमित रूप से सिर्फ छिछोरे किस्म के अंग्रेजी पिक्चर देखते हैं या जो सिर्फ छिछोरे किस्म के अंग्रेजी उपन्यास पढते हैं उनके मनों/जीवनों में उभरते नैतिक छिछोरेपन को देख लीजिये, सच्चाई समझ जायेंगे. सवाल स्त्रीविरोध/पुरुषविरोध का नहीं, बल्कि नैतिक छिछोरेपन के विरोध का है. (link)

Young people from educated families who regularly watch only characterless English films or read only characterless English novels, you should see the emerging characterless nature of their minds and lives, and you’ll understand the truth. The question is not of protesting against men or women, but protesting against moral bankruptcy. (link)

Suresh Chiplunkar speculated on the reasons behind the campaign —

यदि इस मुहिम को “तहलका” का समर्थन हासिल है तब तो यह विशुद्ध रूप से एक राजनैतिक अभियान है, क्योंकि तहलका की विश्वसनीयता और उसकी निष्पक्षता पहले से ही सन्देह के घेरे में है। “वेलेन्टाइन डे के दिन पब-बार को भर दो” का आव्हान तो निश्चित रूप से दारू कम्पनियों द्वारा प्रायोजित लगता है (क्योंकि पैसे के लिये इस प्रकार की पत्रकार कुछ भी कर सकते हैं) और यदि यह मुहिम निशाजी ने स्वयंस्फ़ूर्त ढंग से पैदा किया है तब तो इनकी मानसिक कंगाली पर तरस ही किया जा सकता है।

यदि प्रमोद मुतालिक इन सभी चड्डियों के साथ चिठ्ठी लगाकर वापस भेजें कि “…कल शायद पब में आप नशे में अपनी गुलाबी चड्डी वहीं भूल गई थीं और इसे गलती से मेरे पास भेज दिया गया है, कृपया वापस ले लीजिये…” तो क्या इसे अश्लीलता समझा जायेगा?

If this campaign has Tehelka’s support, then this is undoubtedly a political campaign, because Tehelka’s reliability and impartiality are anyways suspicious. The call to fill the pubs on Valentine’s Day is undoubtedly sponsored by liquor companies (because such journalists can do anything for money), and if Nisha has started this campaign on her own, then we can only pity her mental bankruptcy.

If Pramod Mutalik were to return these panties with a note — it seems that you left behind your panties in the pub last night, in your inebriated state, and they have been sent to me by mistake, please take them back — would it be considered indecent?

Sareetha pointed out that the Pink Chaddi Campaign is a symptom of the divide between ‘Bharat’ and India —

एक ज़माना वो भी था जब सरेआम चड्डियां तार पर सुखाने पर भी पाबंदी थी । लेकिन अब दौर आज़ादी का हैं । लोग खाकी चड्डी से गुलाबी चड्डी तक पर विचार – विमर्श करने से नहीं चूक रहे ।

वास्तव में ये भारत बनाम इंडिया का मसला है । वहां चड्डियां छिपाई जाती हैं यहां चड्डियां दिखाई जाती हैं। गनीमत समझो श्रीराम सेना वालों , जो इन आंदोलनकारियों की बुद्धि भगवान ने फ़ेर दी और आप सबकी इज़्ज़त धूल में मिलने से बच गई । हो सकता था ये लोग गुलाबी चड्डियां गिफ़्ट करने की बजाय खुद धारण कर विरोध जुलूस निकालने पर आमादा हो जाती और विभिन्न सेनाओं के बांकुरों के सामने आ धमकतीं। तब क्या होता??????

There was a time when it was considered wrong to even put out your panties to dry, after washing them. But now, it’s an era of freedom. People aren’t hesitating from discussing everything from khaki shorts to pink panties.

In reality, it’s a question of ‘Bharat’ versus India. In one, panties are hidden; in another, they are displayed. Shri Ram Sena should be glad that their reputation is saved. What if, instead of gifting pink panties, these women had decided to wear them in protest marches in front of the Shri Ram Sena cadre! What would have happened then?

Anil Pusadkar argued that India has far more important issue to tackle than the game of Pink Chaddis —

उस देश मे जहां, आज भी बेरोज़गारी, भुखमरी, गरीबी, अशिक्षा, जैसी गम्भीर समस्या सुरसा की तरह विकराल रुप मे मौज़ूद है,वहां एक विदेशी त्योहार के नाम पर चडडी पहनाने और उतारने का खेल(इसे खेल नही तो और क्या कहा जा सकता है)खेलने मे सारा देश भीड़ गया है।टीवी देखो तो ऐसा लगता है इससे बड़ी इस देश मे कोई समस्या ही नही है।मै तो बस चडडी बांटने और उतारने मे लगे तमाम डिज़ायनर चड्डीधारियों से ये आग्रह करना चाहूंगा कि वे अपने आस-पास भी नज़र दौड़ाए उन्हे बहुत से लोग फ़टी लंगोटी वाले नज़र आएंगे।चड्डी देना ही है तो उनकी मदद करिए शायद आपका दान सही ज़रुरतमंद के काम आ जाए।

In a country where serious issues like unemployment, starvation, poverty and illiteracy seem insurmountable, the entire country has become engaged in the game (because if its not a game, then what is it) of wearing and removing panties, in the name of a foreign festival. If you watch TV, it seems that there isn’t any bigger problem in the country. I’ll only request the designer underwear wearers engaged in wearing and removing panties to look around them and see the many people who are wearing torn singlets. If you must give away your underwear, you should help them, so that your donation may be of some use to the needy.

Tanmay tried to make sense of the protests but didn’t find it relevant to mainstream India —

क्रिया और प्रतिक्रिया के फलस्वरूप होने वाले विरोध में पहले ये जानना ज्यादा जरूरी हो जाता है कि विरोध किया किस बात का जा रहा था। जो चड्डियाँ भेजी जा रही हैं वो किसके विरोध में भेजी जा रही हैं लड़कियों या महिलाओं पर हाथ उठाया गया, उनके साथ मारपीट की गयी इस बात पर या फिर इस बात पर कि लड़कियों को पब में पीने से रोका गया। इस पुरूषवादी समाज में महिलाओं के साथ इस तरह की मारपीट पहली बार नही हुई है, इससे पहले कई मर्तबा हो चुकी है लेकिन कभी उस जोर शोर से हल्ला नही मचाया गया जैसा इस वक्त। और अगर विरोध इस बात पर है कि महिलाओं को पब में क्यों नही पीने दिया गया? तो… पब में जाने वाले क्या लड़के लड़कियाँ समाज के कितने प्रतिशत लोगों का प्रतिनिध्त्व करते हैं। मुश्किल से शायद १५ प्रतिशत या उससे भी कम।

In the midst of these protests and counter-protests, it’s important to understand what we are protesting against. The panties that are being sent, what are they being sent in protest of: the fact that women were beaten up or the fact that women were stopped from drinking in pubs. In this masculine society, this is not the first time violence against women has happened. It has happened many times before and no one has raised their voices against it like this time. And if the protest is against women not being allowed to drink in pubs, what percentage of the society is represented by the men and women who frequent pubs? Hardly 15% and perhaps even less.

Ashish argued that the Pink Chaddi campaign will benefit Nisha Susan and Pramod Mutalik but not solve any problems —

इस आन्दोलन के समर्थकों को एक बार अवश्य सोचना चाहिए कि इससे मीडिया-मुतालिक-पब और चड्डी क्वीन बनी निशा सूसन को फायदा होने वाला है. आम आदमी को इसका क्या लाभ? मीडिया को टी आर पी मिल रही है. मुतालिक का गली छाप श्री राम सेना आज मीडिया और चड्डी वालियों की कृपा से अंतरराष्ट्रीय ख्याति प्राप्त सेना बन चुकी है. अब इस नाम की बदौलत उनके दूसरे धंधे खूब चमकेंगे और हो सकता है- इस (अ) लोकप्रियता की वजह से कल वह आम सभा चुनाव में चुन भी लिया जाए. चड्डी वालियों को समझना चाहिए की वह नाम कमाने के चक्कर में इस अभियान से मुतालिक का नुक्सान नहीं फायदा कर रहीं हैं.

The supporters of this campaign must realize that it will only benefit media-Mutalik-pub and panty queen Nisha Susan. What is the benefit to the common man? Media is getting higher TRPs. Mutalik’s roadside Shri Ram Sena, thanks to media and the panty women, is now known internationally. They’ll use this notoriety to their benefit and, who know, might even win an election as a result of it. The panty women need to understand that, in their pursuit of fame, they are helping, not harming, Mutalik.

Shankar Phulara wrote a sarcastic poem on why the campaign is misguided and pointed out that the Shri Ram Sena cadre are still walking with their heads held high, instead of lowering them in shame.

Even though many Hindi bloggers supported the Pink Chaddi Campaign, they did it half-heartedly, in reaction to the accusations from Sarthi and Suresh.

Atul Chaurasia, who is Nisha Susan’s colleague at Tehelka, supported the Pink Chaddi campaign (also see) —

शायद निशा के अभियान को आप ठीक से समझ नहीं सके हैं. उसने पहले ही साफ कर दिया था कि वैलेंटाइन डे से उसका कोई लेना-देना नहीं है, न ही वो उसकी समर्थक या बैरी है. उसका विरोध सिर्फ श्रीराम सेना के तरीके, उनकी स्वयंभू ठेकेदारी, दूसरों की व्यक्तिगत आजादी का फैसला कोई तीसरा करे जैसे कुछ बेहद मूल मसलों से है.

एक बेहद मौजू सवाल है कभी शांति से दो मिनट मिले तो विचार कीजिएगा. यदि अपकी पुत्री, पत्नी या बहन भरे बाजार इन मतिहीनों का शिकार हो जाने के बाद भी आपकी प्रतिक्रिया क्या यही रहेगी? किसी को भी किसी महिला से ज्यादती करने का अधिकार सिर्फ संस्कृति रक्षा के आडंबर तले दिया जा सकता है क्या? उत्तर शायद नकारात्मक आए.

It seems that you don’t understand Nisha’s campaign. she has already said that it’s not about Valentine’s Day, and she neither supports nor opposes it. Her protest is about basic issues like Shri Ram Sena self-appointing themselves as the custodians of Indian culture and encroaching into our personal freedoms.

Here’s another question you should think about when you have two minutes. If your own daughter, wife or sister were victims of these misguided miscreants, would you have reacted in the same way? Should anyone be allowed to take liberties with any women under the guise of protecting our culture? Maybe, you’ll answer in the negative.

Other bloggers also countered the points raised by the campaign’s detractors using similar arguments.

जो समाज जितना बन्द होगा और जिस समाज मे जितनी ज़्यादा विसंगतियाँ पाई जाएंगी वहाँ विरोध के तरीके और रूप भी उतने ही अतिवादी रूप मे सामने आएंगे।सूसन के यहाँ अश्लील कुछ नही, लेकिन टिप्पणियों मे जो भद्र जन सूसन पर व्यक्तिगत आक्षेप कर रहे हैं वे निश्चित ही अश्लील हैं। (Sujata)

The more closed and warped a society is the more extreme the protests will be. Susan isn’t doing anything indecent, but the men who are throwing personal allegations at Susan are indeed indecent. (Sujata)

जिस समाज में पुरुषत्व बहुत् गहराई तक रचा बसा हुआ हो उस समाज को झंकझोरने के लिए अपनाए जाने तरीके सतही हों तो काम नहीं चलेगा ! जिस समाज में स्त्री -पुरुष की अवस्थिति बाइनरी ऑपोज़िट्स की तरह हो उस समाज में स्त्री और पुरुष द्वारा अपनाए गए विरोध के तरीके समान हों यह कैसे हो सकता है ! (
Neelima)

A society that is seeped in masculinity can only be shaken by unconventional forms of protests. A society in which the situation of men and women is binary opposites, men and women cannot use the same forms of protests. (Neelima)

उस स्थिति मे विरोध का जो भी तरीका हो वों चुप रहने से बेहतर है। और विरोध के तरीके भी कोई सन्दर्भ रहित नही होते। एक अति दूसरी अति को जन्म देगी ये निश्चित है। पर विरोध के तरीके को ग़लत बताने वाले अपने घरो मे दुबक कर क्यो बैठ जाते है, जब राम सेना के विरोध की बारी आती है? क्यों नही इससे ज़्यादा रचनात्मक तरीका ढूंढते है, अपने लोकतंत्र को बचाने का ?
(Swapnadarshi)

In this context, any form of protest is better than keeping quiet. No protest is devoid of context. One excess gives birth to another excess. Why do those who oppose this form of protest stay in their houses when it comes to opposing Shri Ram Sena? Why don’t they think of more creative ways to save our democracy? (Swapnadarshi)

नारी के अंग वस्त्र का प्रदर्शन , यानी भारतीये संस्कृति ख़तम । यानी भारतीये संस्कृति टिकी हैं नारी के अन्ग्वास्त्रो के सहारे ।
(Rachna)

If a woman’s undergarments are revealed, it’s the end of Indian civilization! It means that Indian civilization is held up by women’s undergarments!
(Rachna)

चलिए हम पिंक चड्ढी वालों के विरोध के तरीके का विरोध करें। क्योंकि उनका तरीका संस्कृति के रक्षकों से अधिक खतरनाक है। हम यह ना देखें कि वे अपने वस्त्र उतारकर देने को नहीं कह रहीं, बाजार से नई या फिर अपनी अलमारी से पुरानी भेजने को कह रही हैं। वे इसे क्यों कर रही हैं यह समझने में सोचना पड़ता है, उन्हें समझना पड़ता है, उनके स्थान पर स्वयं को रखकर देखना पड़ता है। यह सोचना पड़ता है कि यदि मैं युवा होती, स्त्री होती तो ये सब परिस्थितियाँ मुझे कैसी लगतीं। वे केवल और केवल एक काम कर रही हैं, इस हास्यास्पद तरीके से कट्टरपंथियों को हास्यास्पद बना रही हैं। हाँ, शायद उन्होंने जानबूझकर इसे ऐसा बनाया ताकि लोगों का ध्यान आकर्शित कर सकें। परन्तु नहीं, वे अधिक खतरनाक हैं। (Ghughuti Basuti)

Let’s protest against the means of protest of the Pink Chaddi Campaign. Because their means are more dangerous than the self-apponited custodians of our culture. To understand why they are doing it, we need to think, we need to understand them, we need to put ourselves in their place. We need to think how I would have felt about the situation if I was young, if I was a woman. They are doing one and only one thing. By using these laughable means they are making the conservatives laughable. Yes, maybe, they deliberately made it so, to attract attention from people. But, no, they are more dangerous. (Ghughuti Basuti)

मुतालिक और इस किस्‍म की तमाम सेनाएं देश के अस्तित्‍व मात्र के लिए भयानक खतरा हैं जिनका हर कदम पर दमभर विरोध होना चाहिए। जिन्‍हें एक तरीके का विरोध पसंद नहीं वे दूसरे तरीके से कर लें लेकिन अपनी ऊर्जा विरोध का विरोध करने की बजाए इन मुतालिकों के विरोध में लगाएं, तथा वे जो खुद इसी सेनाई मानसिकता से हैं वे भी सामने आकर अपनी बात रखें इस उस चड्डी के बहाने छिपकर वार न करें। (
Masijeevi
)

Mutalik and other forces like him are serious threats to the country and need to be ferociously challenged. Those who do not like one form of protest may protest in another way, but they shouldn’t waste their energy protesting the protest, instead of protesting against the Mutaliks. Those who agree with these forces should come out and put forth their arguments and not wage a war on the pretext of criticizing the Chaddi campaign. (
Masijeevi
)

Here are a few other posts on the Pink Chaddi Campaign in other Indian regional languages: Mathavaraj, Neelanjala, ePathram, and Govikannan. I’ll be grateful if the writers, or someone who knows the language, will leave a comment to share the gist of the posts.

Cross-posted at my personal blog.

No responses yet | Categories: 2008-09 Fellows,Culture,Gaurav Mishra,India,Social Change,Social Media | Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Feb 25 2009

Three Lessons Activists and Marketers Can Learn From India’s Valentine’s Day Pink Panty Campaign

by at 3:57 pm

Introduction: The Pink Chaddi Campaign as a case study of online citizen activism in India.

Last week, I wrote a longish roundup of the discussions in Indian mainstream and participatory media around the controversial Pink Chaddi Campaign.

The Pink Chaddi Campaign

Briefly, journalist Nisha Susan set up The Consortium of Pubgoing, Loose, and Forward Women on Facebook and urged women to gift pink panties to Pramod Mutalik, the head of the ultra-conservative Hindu group Shri Ram Sena, in order to shame him into backing down from his threats to disrupt Valentine’s Day celebrations.

The campaign has become one of the best Indian examples of how a grassroots community can come together, collaborate and take collective action using social media tools.

I have written before that managing collaboration in an online community is a cloud problem (irregular and unpredictable) rather than a clock problem.

We know the boundary conditions which are necessary for a vibrant community, but we also know that these conditions are not sufficient. So, most social media “initiatives” are trial and error affairs. Most websites fail to become vibrant communities. Most communities fail to collaborate towards a shared objective. Most collaboration fails to produce collective action. Most collective action fails to achieve the desired results.

So, instead of a how-to checklist, we have case studies of one-off success stories. But these one-off success stories are important because they help us get a sense of the boundary conditions which are necessary for effective collaboration and collective action in online communities.

In this post, I’ll outline three lessons that activists and marketers can learn from the Pink Chaddi Campaign.

Lesson 1: Build your campaign around the zeitgeist, or the social, cultural and political ethos of your identified target group. Then, give it a humorous or irreverent tweak to help it stick.

The Pink Chaddi Campaign tapped into the nationwide outrage against Shri Ram Sena after its activists beat up a group of young women in a Mangalore pub, claiming that the women were violating traditional Indian values by wearing Western clothes and drinking alcohol with men (Wikipedia).

It’s important to note, however, that this outrage was mostly limited to a small but increasingly vocal section of Indian society: young men and women in urban India, who are isolated from the harsh realities of the rest of India by a lucky combination of family background, education, and work.

We come from liberal families (or have broken away from family ties), speak English as our first language, often work in the new economy sectors of media, entertainment and technology, and spend our free time socializing with friends and strangers on online communities and in neighborhood shopping malls. We believe in personal freedom and even libertarianism but don’t really consider ourselves particularly Westernized (because all our friends are like us).

We know that our parents, or at least some of our friends’ parents, don’t really understand the appeal of hanging out in cafes and pubs. We also know that they actively dislike the idea of dating, premarital sex and love marriages, especially if it involves their daughter.

We know that even the most liberal Indian politicians are closet conservatives, and many Indian politicians are illiterate goons. Sometimes, we read stories of women being raped, burned or killed in villages because they had an affair with someone from another caste and feel ashamed of our country.

But we close our eyes and tell ourselves that the shining emergent India we know is not the same as the dark shameful India of illiterates, bigots and goons. Then, Mumbai happens, or Mangalore happens, and the world as we know it, with its clearcut boundaries between us and them, collapses around us.

With its unconventional choice of name, The Consortium of Pubgoing, Loose, and Forward Women on Facebook self-consciously appealed to this strong sense of us versus them. It reached out to the small minority of men and women in India who are amused by the irony of a woman being called ‘Pubgoing, Loose, and Forward’ in the same sentence. It also self-consciously distanced itself from the Indian mainstream which still wants its Bollywood heroines to be virginal and associates ‘Pubgoing, Loose, and Forward Women’ with the Bollywood vamps of yesteryears.

The choice of sending pink panties to Shri Ram Sena further reinforced this self-consciously ironical positioning. Chaddi means ‘underwear’ in several Indian languages, but combined with the choice of colour — pink — it essentially means pink panties.

When asked why she had chosen the pink panty as the focal point of her protest, Nisha Susan couldn’t come up with a clear answer. Sometimes, she said that it was a reference to the khaki-shorts-wearing RSS cadres who are often derisively called “chaddi wallahs” (underwear wearers). Sometimes, she said that she chose pink because it is a frivolous colour. Sometimes, she chose to highlight the feminism of pink against the machismo of saffron, the Sangh Parivar’s colour of choice. She also mentioned that the gift of pink panties was a gift of love, in the Valentine’s Day tradition, meant to shame Shri Ram Sena into backing down from its threats to disrupt Valentine’s day celebrations. Some participants in the campaign even suggested that the act of sending pink panties was an assertion that Indian women are ready to put aside their sense of shame and fight for their rights.

I think all these interpretations are correct, but, at the core of the campaign was the idea of inverting the sense of shame. The Shri Ram Sena wanted to shame Indian women into submission. The gift of pink panties didn’t only serve as an ironical act of defiance (“we won’t be shamed”) but also struck at their own sense of maleness (“you should be ashamed”). That’s why gifting pink panties was a better symbol than gifting bangles, which symbolizes “you should be ashamed”, but not “we won’t be shamed”.

Consciously or unconsciously, Nisha Susan had designed the perfect viral campaign. The pink chaddi campaign was not only relevant for its target audience, it was also funny and irreverent. An ironical inside joke is often the perfect viral hook, just ask the hipsters.

Lesson 2: Build virality into your campaign. Choose a compelling message that users want to share. Then, use a platform that makes it easy for them to share the message.

In the last section, I have explained why gifting pink panties on the Valentine’s Day was the perfect symbol for the protest against Shri Ram Sena. But a great viral idea,in itself, isn’t enough. It also needs to be packaged into a compelling and easy to share message. That’s where the brilliantly designed Pink Chaddi Campaign Poster comes in.

Nisha had first designed the poster herself by photoshopping an image of an RSS chaddiwala —

The Original Pink Chaddi Poster

However, she realized that she didn’t want to specifically target the RSS and asked her designer friend to redesign the poster. The rest, as they say, is history.

I would argue that it was the poster that helped the Pink Chaddi campaign go viral, in India and internationally. It was simple both in its design and its symbolism. Take a retro Hindu calendar with an Om, replace the Om with a pink panty, add some retro fonts and you have the perfect poster that triggers Bollywood, Hindutva, and irrevenece at the same time. More than three-fourths of the posts that linked to the Pink Chaddi Campaign blog also displayed the poster.

The choice of Facebook, instead of Orkut, as the social networking platform was also symbolic of the self-conscious us versus them positioning. Almost two third of active internet users in India use Orkut, whereas Facebook is primarily used by a more metro-centered elite crowd, who are often introduced to it by friends in US universities. For highest reach, the campaign should have been present on both Orkut and Facebook (like its rival The Pink Condom Campaign), but it strengthened its us versus them positioning by exclusively focusing on Facebook.

Facebook is also the perfect viral platform, with its hyperactive news feed. Every time an user joined The Consortium of Pubgoing, Loose, and Forward Women on Facebook, an announcement showed up in the news feeds of all their friends. Members could also actively invite their friends to join the group, and given that I got half a dozen invites myself, many members did use the invite feature.

The campaign also asked group members to share pictures of themselves with the pink panties they were gifting, and many did, both on the Facebook group and on their own blogs. This was an explicit viral element that also helped the campaign gain traction.

Assuming that the average group member has 200 friends (a conservative number), up to 10 million facebook users were exposed to the campaign. Even if we factor in a high degree of duplication in the friend lists of members, it will be safe to say that millions of Facebook users saw the campaign in their news feeds.

Lesson 3: Design your campaign to translate online engagement into offline action. Use modularity and granularity to make it easy to take collective action by breaking it down into smaller individual actions that can be taken independently.

The Pink Chaddi campaign was also designed to trigger offline action, gifting pink panties to Shri Ram Sena on Valentine’s Day. Finally, almost 2000 panties were sent to Shri Ram Sena, against a target of 5000.

I think that the campaign was able to drive offline action, because it made the action both modular and granular. It broke down the task of sending 5000 pink panties to Shri Ram Sena into smaller individual tasks and it made the individual tasks really small: send one panty to the Sena.

The address of Sena’s Hubli office was shared prominently on all campaign messaging and supporters were encouraged to directly mail panties to the address. Alternatively, panties could also be dropped at designated collection centers, but the collection centers were quickly overwhelmed with the demands put on them.

Compare this to the difficulties of organizing a protest march at a specific time and place, a traditional model of protest that doesn’t benefit from the possibility of organizing collective online actions that consist of aggregated modular and granular individual tasks.

Finally, Nisha Susan displayed great media savvy by holding a series of press conferences to publicize the campaign. Nisha is a journalist herself with Tehelka and realizes that “participatory media is most effective when it is able to push up important stories into the legacy news media.” Media attention is part of the reason why the Indian blogosphere’s protests in the 2005 TOI-Mediaah! and the 2009 NDTV-Kunte cases were limited to online chest-thumping while the 2005 anti-IIPM campaign and now the Pink Chaddi campaign resulted in successful offline action.

The three elements aren’t unique to the Pink Chaddi Campaign. For instance, the same three elements also led to the success of President Barack Obama’s 2008 election campaign. The campaign tapped into the US citizens’ frustration with the Bush administration and their desire for real change. The campaign did a great job of creating a compelling message around the theme of change and Obama’s African American background itself acted as the viral tweak. The campaign also created MyBarackObama as a community for its supporters and enabled them to collaborate with each other to bring their shared vision to life. Finally, the campaign developed tools that made clever use of modulaity and granularity to agrregate small individual actions like giving a small donation, writing a blog post, organizing a local event, or making get-out-the-vote calls, into a well-coordinated campaign.

Conclusion: Questions in the aftermath of the Pink Chaddi Campaign.

There are many unanswered question at the end of the Pink Chaddi Campaign.

The first question is: was the campaign really successful?

The answer is the universally unsatisfactory “it depends”. The campaign was undoubtedly successful in terms of creating reach and engagement but it’s not sure if it brought about any real change.

Let’s talk about reach first. More than 50000 users joined the campaign group on Facebook. More than 300 blogs linked to the campaign blog. More than 150 news stories mentioned the campaign. These are unusually high numbers for a grassroots online campaign in India. At the same time, the media attention also helped Shri Ram Sena and brought its leader Pramod Mutalik into national limelight (Zubin Driver at IBN Live and D P Satish at IBNLive).

In terms of engagement, the campaign generated interest amongst both men and women both in India and internationally. It also started a serious debate in both mainstream and participatory media over who gets to define Indian culture. At the same time, we must remember that the debate was limited to a small minority of Indian elites. I don’t think that the campaign changed the views of the Indian mainstream and it might even have alienated them — and I’m talking about the educated, urban Indian mainstream here, not villagers in Eastern Uttar Pradesh (Sagarika Ghose at The Hindustan Times and Swapan Dasgupta at TOI).

Finally, in terms of impact, the campaign did mobilize significant offline action. Getting Indian women to send 2000 pink panties to Shri Ram Sena is no small achievement. The public debate around the campaign also forced Shri Ram Sena to back down on its threats of disrupting Valentine’s day celebrations. However, as many observers have pointed out, the campaign didn’t really change anything. Public opinion on Shri Ram Sena is still divided in India and most of its leaders are unlikely to be punished by law.

The second question is: what happens now that Valentine’s Day is over?

We have seen before that successful online citizen activism movements that are organized around an event often fail to keep the momentum going once the event is over. I have written before about Egypt’s April 6 Youth Movement Facebook Group which floundered after its original purpose was served.

Nisha Susan is trying to maintain the momentum of the group by asking them to stake a claim for our shared culture by creating one minute videos about what Indian culture means to each one of us. It looks like a plan the might work, but only time will tell.

Cross-posted on my personal blog.

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Feb 19 2009

The Valentines Day Pink Chaddi Campaign: Indian Pubgoing Women Vs. Shri Ram Sena

by at 1:11 am

The Pink Chaddi Campaign — organized on Valentines Day by The Consortium of Pubgoing, Loose, and Forward Women to protest against the right wing Hindu group Shri Ram Sena — has become one of the best Indian examples of how a grassroots community can come together, collaborate and take collective action using social media tools.

It all started on January 24th when a group of 40 activists of the Shri Ram Sena (also spelled as Sri Ram Sena, Shri Rama Sena, Sri Rama Sena, Sri Ram Sene, Shri Ram Sene and Sriram Sena) barged into a Mangalore pub and beat up a group of young women and men, claiming that the women were violating traditional Indian values by wearing Western clothes and drinking alcohol with men (Wikipedia). The video of the incident was repeatedly shown on Indian TV channels and widely shared online and became the focal point of a nationwide outrage against the incident (Global Voices) —

However, the incident evoked mixed reactions. Even as most people denounced the incident, and some even called it the “Talibanisation of India” and “Hindu Talibanism”, many prominent politicians suggested that condemning the incident isn’t the same as condoning “pub culture” and “the Westernization of Indian youth”. Some politicians, and even the National Commission for Women, condemned “the loosening of moral standards amongst young women” and called for controls on pub licenses and alcohol consumption in public (NYT, Reuters 1, Reuters 2, India Today).

Shri Ram Sena chief Pramod Mutalik was unrepentant and vowed, on May 4th, to disrupt Valentine’s Day celebrations in Karnataka, calling it an “international Christian conspiracy against Indian culture”. He also threatened to force unmarried couples found together on Valentine’s Day to get married unless they agreed to tie rakhis on their wrists signifying that they are brother and sister (IBNLive, India Today and The Telegraph). Another Sangh Parivar member Bajrang Dal also threatened similar actions (Indian Express). These Valentine’s Day disruptions, often led by Hindu nationalist parties like Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), Rashtriya Swayamsewak Sangh (RSS) and Vishwa Hindu Parishad (VHP), have become common in India over the last decade (BBC).

One organization responded to these threats by calling for pepper-spray squads to protect couples on Valentine’s Day while another organization promised to deploy teams of taekwando experts to blacken the faces of miscreants with shoe polish (Times Online).

Nisha Susan, a journalist, set up The Consortium of Pubgoing, Loose, and Forward Women on Facebook and mobilized the protests around the Pink Chaddi Campaign (chaddi is a Hindi word for underwear) —

The Pink Chaddi Campaign

The Pink Chaddi Campaign kicked off on February 5th with the objective of sending 5000 pink underwears to Shri Ram Sena in order to shame them. Using Facebook and feminist blogs, Nisha urged women to mail new or old pink underwear to Pramod Muthalik, or drop them at collection points. She also urged group members to share pictures of the pink underwear they were giving, in order to inspire other women. The group decided to use “chaddi” as the focal point because the khaki-shorts-wearing RSS cadres are often derisively called “chaddi wallahs” (chaddi wearers).

Soon, other Indian and international blogs picked up the story. More than 270 blogs have linked to the campaign blog as per Technorati and the “Pink Chaddi” search feed on Twitter is still active. The Facebook group has also been a runaway success. As of now, it has more than 48,000 members and a vibrant community with more than 350 discussion topics and more than 6750 wall posts.

The campaign also supported the Pub Bharo (fill the pubs) campaign proposed by the Minister of State for Women and Child Development, Renuka Choudhury, which encouraged women to visit a pub on Valentine’s Day to show support for the victims of the Mangalore pub violence (TOI and Mid-Day). The Facebook group run by her daughter Tejaswini Choudhury has 4200 members as of now.

Another Facebook group that wants to celebrate March 1st as World Kamastutra Day has 2300 members.

Yet another Facebook group that wants to “Send Pramod Muthalik a Valentine’s Day Card” has 1300 members (TOI).

There is also a Hug Karo campaign asking people to hug each other on Valentine’s Day (see DesiCritics), that is similar to the global Free Hugs campaign.

A group of “ordinary Hindus, who don’t bark on television channels to defend our faith, but definitely get hurt when some people bark against our faith”, started The Pink Condom Campaign to protest against the “sickular Pink Chaddi walas” (Indian Express and DNA). The group behind the campaign — “The Self-respecting Hindus’ Initiative for Equality and Liberty with Dignity” or SHIELD — has been less successful, with only 160 supporters on Facebook and 111 supporters on Orkut so far.

The Pink Condom Campaign

Priyanka Narain at LiveMint has a great roundup of all the pro-Valentine’s Day protests organized on social networking sites.

The Pink Chaddi campaign has resulted in serious embarrassment for the right wing Sangh Parivar, in general, and Pramod Mutalik, in particular. More than 2000 chaddis were sent to him and digs were taken at his single status (TOI and The Guardian).

Even Indian FMCG brand Amul joined in the protests with a characteristic billboard (see CSR Asia for a background on Amul’s socially conscious billboard campaigns) —

Amul Pink Chaddi Campaign

However, Pramod Mutalik responded by calling the Pink Chaddi campaign a “a base tactic to shy away from the core issue of Indian culture” (TOI). He also promised to give pink saris to the women gifting him pink underwear (TOI), with the help of a related women’s organization Durga Sena (TOI). In the end, fearing public backlash, the Shri Ram Sena called off the Valentine’s Day disruptions (TOI and India Today).

The campaign has attracted mixed reactions from the Indian blogosphere, with many observers praising its creativity and virality and others criticizing its frivolity and calling it undignified.

In a poll at Desipundit, 77% of the 459 respondents thought that the campaign was “clever and creative” while only 23% thought that it was a “waste of time”.

Snighdha Sen at BlogHer says that the campaign embodies the spirit of Gandhigiri, a contemporary reading of the tenets of Gandhism popularized by the the 2006 Hindi film, Lage Raho Munna Bhai.

Roshan Krishnan at Desicritics feels that the campaign is an indicator that “civil society is finally asserting itself in India”.

Samhita at Feministing asks us to “resist the urge to suggest that given the cultural climate of India these women shouldn’t have been in a bar.”

Poonam points out that this is not the first time panties have been used as a symbolic protest. In late 2007, Lanna Action for Burma group had launched a Panties for Peace campaign and urged women around the world to “post, deliver or fling your panties at the closest Burmese Embassy” to protest against the repressive junta leader General Than Shwe (The Register).

Anindita Sengupta at Ultraviolet thinks that the Pink Chaddi campaign is about shaming the right-wing conservatives.

Amit Varma at the India Uncut argues that the issue is not whether a lifestyle is right or wrong, but “the right to choose our own lifestyle, any lifestyle”.

The right-leaning blogger Offstumped is apparently offended by the references to “Hindu Taliban” and exhorts the women behind the Pink Chaddi campaign to send pink burqas to Al-Qaeda’s Mustafa Abu Al-Yazid instead.

Sakshi argues that the Pink Chaddi campaign doesn’t address any real issue about why Shri Ram Sena’s ultra-conservative stand resonates with most Indians.

The “GreatBong” Arnab writes a twisted Valentine’s Day morality tale, which seems to rubbish both parties.

The Pink Chaddi campaign has also resulted in several videos for and against it. Ruchika Muchhala at Global Voices points to some of these.

Here is a video showing the pile of pink underwear before they were sent to Pramod Mutalik —

Here is a video of Nisha Susan talking to Mid Day about the campaign —

Here’s a series of animated videos (1, 2) on the Pink Chaddi campaign —

Here’s a ridiculous right-wing video that tries to counter the Pink Chaddie campaign —

The campaign has also attracted the attention of mainstream news organizations, including international majors like NYT, BBC, Fox News, The Guardian, ABC, Times Online, LA Times, MSNBC and NPR.

The opinion in Indian mainstream media, however, is equally divided.

Dan Collins at LAist says that the Pink Chaddi movement is both inspiring and oddly exhilarating (also see the cute picture of the Pink Chaddi Payphone).

Kate Allen at The New Statesman is pleasantly surprised that the campaign is supported by both men and women, unlike “Britain and Europe (where) violence against women is generally seen as a ‘women’s issue’”.

Pradeep Nair at TOI compares the campaign to the feminist bra burning of the late 1960s and sees it as “a turning point for blogs and social networking sites” in India.

Anoothi Vishal at Business Standard sees the Pink Chaddi campaign as part of a larger trend where a handful of Indians are acting as catalysts, often with the help of new media, to bring about political and social change.

Neha Tara Mehta at India Today locates the Pink Chaddi campaign as part of a growing trend of online citizen activism in India.

Udaalak Mukerjee at The Telegraph says that he admires the women behind the Pink Chaddi campaign, because “at a time when we are busy building barriers to screen ourselves from disturbing actualities, they have managed to break a few in order to meet the enemy in the eye.”

Tavleen Singh at Indian Express says that the campaign should have sent pink chaddis to BJP’s prime ministerial candidate Lal Krishna Advani who has endorsed the Shri Ram Sena’s excesses by his silence.

Sagarika Ghose at The Hindustan Times calls the campaign undignified and warns against the elitism amongst the Westernized urban Indian youth who are choosing “lifestyles that are desi imitations of Sex And The City”.

Zubin Driver at IBN Live has a great post on how Pramod Mutalik has benefited from the media attention on the Pink Chaddi campaign. D P Satish at IBNLive also has an interesting post on how the media attention has made Mutalik’s political career.

Swapan Dasgupta at TOI argues that the Pink Chaddi campaign “is likely to reinforce Middle India’s existing prejudices and bolster the stereotype of un-Indian fast and loose women.”

Devangshu Datta in Business Standard, Jai Arjun Singh in Business Standard and Jug Suraiya in TOI choose to write about the campaign in a humorous (read: flippant) vein.

Now that Valentine’s Day is over, there are questions about what will happen to the Facebook group (TOI).

Nisha Susan doesn’t talk about the future in her reflective post at The Guardian looking back at the campaign, but on the Pink Chaddi Campaign blog, she suggests that their achievement lies in “staking a claim for our shared culture” —

So here is the idea. We each make a little video of ourselves. We make a video of ourselves doing something we love, something we think is definitely a part of Indian culture (and let no one dare disagree!). Speak into the camera. Say “This is Indian culture.” Imagine the possibilities, you, your best friend, your grandmother, your 7-year-old nephew, your grumpy boss… each doing what you think is part of you, part of Indian culture.

This promises to be fun!

Cross-posted at my personal blog.

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