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Associate Professor and Clovis and Hala Maksoud Chair in Arab Studies
Center for Contemporary Arab Studies
Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service
Georgetown University
Washington DC  20057-1020
Tel: (202)-687-8192
E-mail: fja25@georgetown.edu

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Dr. Fida Adely is an Associate Professor of Arab Studies and Anthropology at the Center for Contemporary Arab Studies in Georgetown University’s School of Foreign Service.  She is a cultural anthropologist whose research interests include education in the Arab world, gender and development, gender and labor, and development in the Arab world more broadly.

In addition to numerous articles and book chapters, Dr. Adely has written a book based on her ethnographic research about education in Jordan, entitled Gendered Paradoxes: Educating Jordanian Women in Nation, Faith and Progress (University of Chicago Press, 2012).

Dr. Adely is currently working on a book manuscript about the internal labor migration of single professional women in Jordan. The manuscript draws on the narratives of these women to illuminate how demographic and socio-economic shifts within Jordan have shaped particular lives, and how a group of young educated women have worked to take advantage of these shifts. The book analyzes the effects of developments such as expanded educational opportunities, urbanization, privatization and the restructuring of the labor market on women’s life trajectories, gender roles, the institution of marriage, and kinship relations.

In a related project, Dr. Adely had conducted research on marriage and the purported marriage crisis in the region, with a particular focus on Jordan. Based on over 50 interviews with single men and women, Adely explores the challenges young people face as they seek to find suitable marriage partners in a context of shifting economic realities and gendered expectations. Some of this research is discussed in “A Different Kind of Love: Compatibility (Insijam) and Marriage in Jordan” (Arab Studies Journal, 2016).

 

 


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