Monthly Archives: February 2016

The Revenant – Man and Nature

Hi class! As most of you know, the Oscars was this weekend. I am unashamedly elated that Leonardo DiCaprio won for his performance in The Revenant. Regarding the context of our class, his acceptance speech hit home.  Check out this link and start the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Neither Mourning Nor Melancholia: Adonais

In Shelley’s poem “Adonais,” the reader witnesses the poet’s mourning of Keats. The poet initially makes it seem as if his mourning will not extend indefinitely to melancholia. According to Freud, in the case of melancholia, the individual cannot consciously … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Sea Change

Listen! you hear the grating roar Of pebbles which the waves draw back, and fling, At their return, up the high strand, Begin, and cease, and then again begin, With tremulous cadence slow, and bring The eternal note of sadness … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Melancholia & Elegy

If we assume that Freud is correct about his suppositions regarding the psychological state of melancholy, and we agree with Tim Morton about the result of environmental elegy, then we are faced with quite the ethical conundrum. What is the role of … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Heathcliff and Melancholia

I’m stuck thinking about the concept of one person being another person–“I am Heathcliff,” as Catherine says. What connects one human to another human? What connects a human to the environment, to nature? In Freud’s “Mourning and Melancholia,” Freud focuses … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

2Pac: A Way to Teach Elegy to High School Students

I tutor adjudicated youths in the DC court system. My students are often intimidated by poetry. I do not blame them. For example, “Adonais: An Elegy on the Death of John Keats”, is a monster marathon of a poem. It … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Mourning and Melancholia, Lycidas, and Melancholia

John Milton’s “Lycidas”, is a pastoral elegy about his deceased friend, Edward King. The speaker laments his friend’s death and goes through several phases of the mourning process. He explains the compulsion to speak, either because of obligation or grief: “Bitter constraint, and … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The Raft of Folly

Gericault’s “The Raft of Medusa” depicts a notorious shipwreck whose survivors endured tribulation after tribulation on the open sea in 1816, clinging to flotsam that was once the French frigate Medusé. In the thirteen days it took for rescue to … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration

In his lecture, Jackson encourages the creation of a billion dollar prize award to whoever can find a way to sequester carbon dioxide. While this is a great way to tackle climate change, I doubt anyone will be claiming that prize … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

The Gondal Poems: A Symbolic Evolution

Evident in Emily Brontë’s Gondal Poems One and Two is a distinct symbolic resonance: midnight, moonlight, heaven, glory, the stars – all are invoked in the first stanza of each, a clue that there is a common thread sewn through … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment