Alex Garvey-Remediation

Hello Professor Hensley and Grace, I have attached here a Word Document of my remediation post because I wanted you to have the source medium (the novel) as a reference but the scene that I have chosen is quite long in the novel and I thought it might be a bit much for the blog format. I have posted my 500-word response below though for for ease of access for the class. Best, Alex.

Alex Garvey-Remediation

When I was translating the novel’s scene of the riot it is difficult because the scene in the novel is much longer than what would be expected for an actual scene in a movie. This eliminates many nuances that could allow the person viewing the scene to understand the relationship between Mr. Thornton and Margaret Hale. In the text, we are completely in tune with Margaret’s thoughts and feelings. We know that she feels utter despair and fear when she sees Mr. Thornton standing up the rioters. When you watch a scene in a movie, it is impossible to tell if an action was impulsive or not, or if it has an ulterior motive. All that you see is the surface action and its surface consequences. Unless another character speaks aloud and expresses an opinion about something in particular, we are at a total loss as to the private thoughts of those characters. There are ways that films try to overcome this, for example having a voice-over narration at certain points in the story. However, this is normally limited to only a few key moments and if overused could really ruin a movie. As such, it is usually up to the viewer to make their own interpretation of the events they are seeing unfold. When I was writing the script for this scene, I made sure to add in as much overt action as I could. For example, Margaret and Mr. Thornton looking into each other’s eyes, Margaret’s small smile behind Mr. Thornton’s back. I also had to try and make the scene sound much more dramatic and have there be more tension between the characters than the novel has in order to keep the viewer engaged.

Additionally, I had to write out what I myself feel the movie version would sound like, since I cannot get a set together and actors and produce this scene and film it myself. This means that as the person reading this, you have your own interpretation of what I have written the movie scene might sound like. The view I have in my head probably looks very different than what another student reading this might have. As you can see, the complexities are endless in this scenario. Furthermore, North and South has already been translated at least once into a film, which is divided into a series of four episodes. The riot scene is short and filled with emotion, as well as plenty of romantic tension between Mr. Thornton and Margaret. The movie is definitely more fast paced, exciting, and passionate—which is done naturally in order to excite the viewer. I have seen the movie before, and had this in my head when writing the scene I have portrayed, but have my own interpretation of how I believe the scene should be. Even though my destination is a film, it would undoubtedly look much different than the film that has already been made, further reflecting the layers of complexity associated with remediation.