Monthly Archives: October 2016

Sinking Ship

In the middle of a description of the Durbeyfield family, Hardy inserts the observation that the children of the family are trapped in the “Durbeyfield ship”: “If the heads of the Durbeyfield household chose to sail into difficulty, disaster, starvation, … Continue reading

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Parental Shortcomings

Tess’s opinion of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Durbeyfield, is not very positive. She repeatedly points out their faults and even compares the intelligence of her mother and father to that of “a happy child” (p. 37). It is true … Continue reading

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What’s In A Name?

Names play a central role in the events of the first section of “Tess of the D’Ubervilles.” The first scene we are presented with is Jack being called “Sir John” by a parson, which serves as a catalyst for the … Continue reading

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Alec D’Urberville and strawberries

Throughout the interactions between Tess and Alec D’Urberville, Tess’s lack of consent and Alec’s disregard for her desires are strongly emphasized, placing all of the fault on Alec. This pattern starts off at their first introduction with Alec insisting on placing … Continue reading

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The Lifted Veil / Adam Smith: OUR DIAGRAM

“Though our brother is upon the rack, as long as we ourselves are at our ease, our senses will never inform us of what he suffers. They never did, and never can, carry us beyond our own person, and it … Continue reading

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Limited Sympathy

The Lifted Veil is written in first person with small breaks in which Latimer writes directly to the reader imploring them to listen to him and his advice. The most noticeable of these breaks is when he asks the reader, … Continue reading

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Latimer, the antihero

The Lifted Veil, similarly to other 19th-Century novels like Jane Eyre, seeks to combine the supernatural with reality, forcing the reader to constantly question what is real and what may or may not be a fantasy. However, unlike Jane Eyre, … Continue reading

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Sympathy versus Pity/Mercy for the Dead

I was really struck by I.I.13, the section in which Adam Smith discusses humankind’s complex process of sympathy for the dead. Smith describes the strangeness of our unwillingness to accept the lack of suffering in those already dead; we imagine them as … Continue reading

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What is the “Lifted Veil”?

The Lifted Veil is George Eliot’s novella about the role of sympathy in the setting of human society. Throughout the story, the reader learns of Latimer’s ability to both hear the thoughts of others and to see into the future, … Continue reading

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The Lifted Veil

In, the Lifted Veil, Latimer’s bride Bertha attempts to poison him at the end of the novel. After living apart emotionally for so long, and having a truly loveless marriage, it is strange that she decides at the end of … Continue reading

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