Author Archives: Barbara Monroe

New York City’s Soda Ban

If you are interested in New York City’s much-discussed plan to block the sale of large sugary drinks by restaurants and other establishments, make sure to read Georgetown Law Professor Lawrence Gostin’s March 13th CNN opinion piece Banning Large Sodas is Legal and Smart

For more on the background of the ban, check out NYC’s Department of Health & Mental Hygiene Sugary Drinks web site, which includes links to selected relevant documents, and the Wall Street Journal Law Blog’s A Legal Guide to the Soda Ban Ruling, a short explanation with links to New York State Supreme Court documents, including the March 11 ruling.

Thirsty for more? Learn about researching the laws of New York City from the City of New York section of our New York Research-in-Depth Guide.

Book Giveaway for Georgetown Law Community

Beginning Tuesday, May 29, 2012, the Law Library will give away older editions of casebooks and study aids, as well as treatises and other materials.  The marked giveaway shelf is located in Williams Library in the Loewinger Lounge area of the Reading Room.  The selection of materials will be replenished on a regular basis, and all Georgetown Law students, faculty and staff are welcome to come and help themselves.

The Best Books of 2008–Available at Georgetown Law Library!

You don’t have to go to Border’s or Barnes & Noble to find the most popular books of the past year.  Check out these titles, named in the New York Times 10 Best Books of 2008, the New York Times 100 Notable Books of 2008, Library Journal Best Books 2008, or Choice Reviews Outstanding Academic Titles, 2008, available for you with a swipe of your GoCard!

More to come!

Happy 100th Birthday, Thurgood!

Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall’s 100th birthday is today, July 2, 2008.

These books are available (some electronically) to help you celebrate:

Juneteenth–Black Independence Day

June 19th is celebrated as Black Independence Day–the day that Black residents of Galveston, Texas learned of their freedom in 1865.  The day has come to be known as Juneteenth, and is celebrated throughout the United States.

The Root, Henry Louis Gates’ web site, has a good Primer on Black Independence Day.  You can also come to the library and check out and read Ralph Ellison’s novel, Juneteenth.

You might also find the following titles interesting–they approach the issues of slavery and freedom from unique perspectives: Rebels, Reformers, & Revolutionaries: Collected Essays and Second ThoughtsWounds of Returning: Race, Memory, and Property on the Postslavery Plantation; and Stolen Childhood: Slave Youth in Nineteenth-Century America.  These are just some of the many resources our library offers on slavery and emancipation.  Find more using GULLiver.

New Civil Rights Digital Library

The University of Georgia’s new Civil Rights Digital Library provides organized access to the resources of nearly 100 digital collections to provide a single source for online civil rights research.

The excellent interface allows browsing (Events, People, Places, Topics, Collections) and searching of the collections. There are articles, photographs, legal and government documents, moving images, posters, broadsides and other sources (see the complete list of media types).  The collections of the Thurgood Marshall Law Library at the University of Maryland, the Tarlton Law Library at the University of Texas, Yale Law School, and the Virginia Center for Digital History Information at U.Va. are just a few of those included (click here to see more).

Happy D.C. Emancipation Day!

On April 16, 1862, eight months before the Emancipation Proclamation, President Lincoln signed the District of Columbia Emancipation Act and ended slavery in the District.

The D.C. Government celebrates Emancipation Day today with a series of events including lectures, performances and a parade.

You can read more about Emancipation Day in First Freed: Washington, D.C. in the Emancipation Era which is available on the 5th floor of Williams Library.