Hydration Stations Throughout the Library

We hope you’ve noticed that all of the new hydration stations are complete and we now have at least one on each floor. On the first floor, you will find one just outside of Legal Eats, while the second floor is on the right side of the Reading Room. Each of the other floors have a hydration station in the atrium now, so you can refill your water bottles where ever you are.

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CLC Temporarily Closed (10/16 – 10/17)

The Computer Learning Center (CLC) will be temporarily closed Monday, October 16 – Tuesday, October 17 while IST upgrades all 24 computers with new machines.

During this time, please take advantage of the public terminals and printers available throughout the library.  Any questions can be directed to the Reference and Circulation Desks.

We appreciate your patience and understanding!

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Following the Supreme Court?

The library maintains a research guide on the Supreme Court and has recently subscribed to Proquest Supreme Court Insight, offering you unparalleled resources for research into the U.S. Supreme Court. Access decisions, records and briefs, petitions for writ and more. Please feel free to ask a librarian if you have any questions when using these resources.

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Outside construction update – main doors

The waterproofing work going on outside at the front of the library has a schedule change.  Rather than partially blocking off entrance doors for weeks at a time, all of the work at the main entrance will be done during the upcoming few days:

  • Friday, Sep. 22: the doorway on the east side (closest to New Jersey Ave) of the main entrance will be blocked for the day.  Other entrances will be available;
  • Saturday, Sep. 23:  the doorway in the middle of the main entrance will be blocked for the day.  Other entrances will be available;
  • Monday, Sep. 25: the doorway on the west side (closest to 2nd Street) of the main entrance will be blocked for the day.  Other entrances will be available.

Please also be aware that the trees from the planter on the east patio in front of the library will be removed Sat. morning, Sept. 23 – there may be some chain saw noise from about 8:00 a.m. for an hour or so

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Do you have children?

The library maintains a small collection of children’s books which can be found in the Loewinger Lounge on the left hand side of the Reading Room. We have books for preschoolers and some primary grade books, as well. Feel free to take a book home to your child or if you bring them on campus, feel free to share a book with them in the Loewinger Lounge.

                 

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Law Library Response to 2017 Student Survey

Each spring, the Law Library conducts a survey of our students.  In 2017, 276 students responded to our survey, and we published summary charts of the responses back in April. Now we’re publishing a survey response, to show examples of changes to library facilities, content and services guided by the useful student input.

KIC Scanner & Research Conslutation

We have published the 2017 Law Library Survey Response, where you can see highlights of new hydration stations, new Xerox printers which may also be used for copying, scanning and faxing, the installation of white sound machines in group study rooms, and a new research guide on the history of civil rights in the United States.

We appreciate student input. Throughout the year, you are encouraged to send comments and suggestions through our suggestion page, and please keep an eye out for our next annual survey in

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Check out some portable power

The library has available for circulation several portable power packs.  If you will be sitting someplace without power and you need to charge your laptop, pad, or phone, one of these chargers will allow you to run or charge your device.  

Please see the staff at the Circulation Desk for this and other “cool stuff” – including phone and laptop charging cords – which you can check out for your use.

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Constitution Day is Coming — September 17

To commemorate the importance of the U.S. Constitution, P.L. 108-447 added “Constitution Day” to the law and mandated ” the civil and educational authorities of States, counties, cities, and towns are urged to make plans for the proper observance of Constitution Day and Citizenship Day and for the complete instruction of citizens in their responsibilities and opportunities as citizens of the United States and of the State and locality in which they reside.”

Learn more about the history of Constitution Day by reviewing our Research Guide and checking out the display in the Robert Oakley Reading Room.

 

You can also download an interactive Constitution app from the National Constitution Center.

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Georgetown University’s Scholarly Communication Committee Fall Symposium

Op-Eds, Media Interviews, and Social Media:
Faculty Scholarship in the Public Square
 ___________________________________________________________

 Date: Friday, October 6, 2017
Time: 10:00 am – noon
Place: Murray Room, Lauinger Library, Georgetown University

The Georgetown University Scholarly Communication Committee presents the fall Scholarly Communication Symposium:

Panelists:

Deborah Tannen, University Professor, Department of Linguistics, Georgetown University
Marcia Chatelain, Associate Professor, Department of History, Georgetown University
Autumn Brewington, Former Op-Ed Editor at the Washington Post, and former Editor of the Wall Street Journal’s Think Tank
Danielle Knight, Producer, “1A”, WAMU 88.5 American University Radio and NPR

Moderator:

Sanford Ungar, Director, The Free Speech Project, Georgetown University

Program Description

In addition to traditional scholarship, Georgetown University faculty communicate through a wide variety popular channels, including op-eds, television and radio interviews, magazine articles, and social media. In this symposium, we will explore how faculty bring their research and scholarship to the attention of the public and work toward informing and influencing public discourse and policymaking.

The symposium will address the following issues:

  • What are the benefits of bringing research and scholarship into a public forum for the public, the university, and the individual?
  • How do faculty translate their expert knowledge and complex research into formats that can reach a broad audience?
  • What are the characteristics of effective op-eds, television or radio interviews, and social media postings?
  • How can faculty get started in communicating through the media?
  • Given the value of contributing to public discourse, what incentives and support do we have to encourage faculty to participate in public discourse?

Please RSVP for this exciting event here.

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