Is your job taking you to a new country or city? Still looking for a job?

GoinGlobal has released a new interface! In addition to being a great place to start your job search, GoinGlobal features city and country guides to help those relocating to learn about the new environment.

The unique H1B search allows users to identify employers seeking to hire international professionals with your specific skills.

Georgetown Law students and alumni have full access to this resource. If you set up an account while you are on campus, you will be able to access GoinGlobal world wide for the next six months.

 

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Bloomberg Law’s Tax Practice Center & Lexis.com Retire in December

Bloomberg Law: Tax will soon replace the Tax Practice Center. Starting on December 1, when you select “Tax” from the Practice Centers menu, you will be directed to Bloomberg Law: Tax, where you can access tax research content including BNA Portfolios and Bloomberg BNA Law Reports. The old Tax Practice Center will no longer be available.

On December 31, Lexis.com will retire for academic accounts, and you will no longer be able to access Lexis.com from the law school product menu. All of Lexis.com content will be available on Lexis Advance before the end date.

Questions? Contact a Reference Librarian. You may also contact our Bloomberg Law representative Liana Rizzi (lrizzi@bna.com) or our Lexis account executive Adonica Black (adonica.black@lexisnexis.com).

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Preparing for Exams

As you begin to prepare for exams, supplement your assigned readings and review of past exams with study aids found in the library. Study aids can clarify confusing concepts and even provide practice questions for your review. A variety of study aids are available and the best one to use depends on your course and individual study habits. Most of these books can be found in the Williams Reading Room Reserve, with older editions in the stacks available for checkout.

CALI lessons are another useful exam review option. Over 800 interactive lessons prepared by law professors and librarians cover over 30 practice areas of law. Georgetown students can register for immediate online access.

Good luck with your studies!

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Scholar Studies available for exam prep

From November 28 through December 17, unassigned Scholar Studies will be available for reservation in addition to our usual 21 group study rooms. Scholar Studies are smaller spaces that accommodate a limited number of students, 2 at maximum. These studies will require only one Law NetID and can be reserved up to 5 hours a day.  Starting November 21 there will be a link on the Group Study Room reservation page to reserve these study spaces.

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Group study rooms

A reminder tGroupSR_Williams_122A-chat if you have a study group of 3 or more people, you can reserve a group study room for up to three hours. The booking system gives you details on the features and capacities of the various rooms in case you need extra amenities such as a white board or Apple TV interface. If you have not used the group study room reservation system before, you can find out how here.

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Brexit

Brexit hits a roadblock

In early October, Prime Minister Theresa May announced plans to trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty before the end of March 2017, which would start the clock on the 2 year process of the U.K. leaving the European Union. However, a British high court has now ruled that the government must allow Parliament to approve the country’s departure from the E.U. While this decision will not stop Brexit, it is likely to slow the process, as May must now seek Parliament’s approval before starting the process of leaving the E.U. rather than waiting till after the 2-year process has been concluded. May has vowed to appeal this ruling to the British Supreme Court.

It should be noted that the decision rests on the holding that “The most fundamental rule of the U.K. Constitution is that Parliament is sovereign and can make or unmake any law it chooses.” This is the same argument made by those who wished to leave the E.U. in the first place.

The government claimed in its argument that under residual powers of royal prerogative, which cover international treaty-making, it had the power to invoke Article 50 without a vote in Parliament. This argument did not appear to hold water for the court who held that invoking Article 50 without the consent of Parliament would be a violation of the 1972 European Communities Act, a law that incorporates European laws into the British legal system and that provides that only Parliament has the power to invoke clauses like Article 50.

The decision is an interesting piece of constitutional law for British legal scholars. For more information on Brexit, please look at our U.K. research guide. For information on British constitutional law, search our catalog for books and articles that will give you a more in-depth appreciation for how the U.K. handles constitutional issues without having a written constitution. As always, we are available for research consultations and at the reference desks or via chat.

 

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New Database – HeinOnline Slavery in America and the world: History, Culture & Law

This HeinOnline collection brings together, for the first time, all known legal materials on slavery in the United States and the English-speaking world. This includes every statute passed by every colony and state on slavery, every federal statute dealing with slavery, and all reported state and federal cases on slavery.

Additionally, hundreds of texts, addresses, hymns and convention proceedings are included in this comprehensive collection. UNC Press features 50 full-color, current titles on slavery in this collection as well.

Researchers can search the full text of all documents included in the collection, or search for a specific title using the Advanced Search page.

For further information, refer to the quick guide prepared by HeinOnline.

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Featured collection (election special): The Center for a New Democracy collection

The Center for a New Democracy, a project of the Tides Foundation, was established in 1991 to promote democratic reform through research, public education, litigation, and community organizing and training. A particular focus was on public financing of elections and fair voting reforms. The CND existed until 1996, and Donna Edwards served as its director from 1994-1996.

The collection (NEJL 064) was donated to the NEJL in 1996, and it includes case files and other materials related to state ballot initiatives in favor of campaign finance reform in the mid 1990s: Missouri Proposition A (Carver v. Nixon and Shrink v. Maupin); Minnesota (Day v. Holahan); California (Pro-Life Council PAC v. Jan Scully); Colorado (Colorado Right to LIfe Committee v. Victoria Buckley, Secretary of State); Montana (Right to Life Ass., et al. v. Robert Eddleman, County Attorney); Maine (Maine Right to Life Committee v. Federal Election Comm.); Oregon (Center to Protect Free Speech, Inc. v. Oregon); Washington, D.C. (National Black Police Assn. et.al. v. DC Board of Elections and Ethics).

In addition, the collection includes a range of reports, pamphlets, and articles (gray literature) on campaign finances in various states and in the U.S., including statewide surveys of “American Attitudes Toward Money in Politics” conducted by Bannon Research on behalf of the Center for a New Democracy in Massachusetts; Montana, Maine, Oregon, Colorado, and California.

Of particular local interest are the materials related to Initiative 41, a 1992 ballot initiative in Washington, D.C. that limited contributions to $100 for the election cycle for district-wide races and $50 per cycle for Ward races. The Center for a New Democracy and the DC community group DC ACORN, a principal supporter of the initiative, undertook a study to analyze the early impact of Initiative 41 on elections in the District. The collection also includes case files from National Black Police Association v. District of Columbia, 108 F.3d 346, 348-49 (D.C.Cir.1997). The case challenged the constitutionality of the new D.C. law as imposing “unprecedented limitations on the right of individuals and groups to contribute, and of political candidates to accept, contributions in support of campaigns for elected public office.”

A collection inventory exists, and the collection can be accessed at Georgetown Law Library’s Special Collections reading room.

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Law Library Response to 2016 Student Survey

Each spring, the Law Library conducts a survey of our students.  In 2016, 245 students responded to our survey, and we published summary charts of the responses back in April. Now we’re publishing a survey response, to show examples of changes to library facilities, content and services guided by the useful student input.

Monthly Table DaysWe have published the 2016 Law Library Survey Response, where you can see highlights of new hydration stations, new shelf guides for locating materials within the stacks, as well as the introduction of the OneSearch tool for discovering articles, books, databases, and other resources from many places.

We appreciate student input. Throughout the year, you are encouraged to send comments and suggestions through our suggestion page, and please keep an eye out for our next annual survey in spring of 2017.

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