What We’re Reading: Teaching with Classroom Response Systems

Recently, many of us at CNDLS have been reading Teaching with Classroom Response Systems: Creating Active Learning Environments. The author, Derek Bruff, who is visiting Georgetown on Feburary 7 and 8, is an assistant director at the Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching. In his book , he explores the many different choices that instructors can make when using classroom response systems, also known as clickers, in their teaching. Drawing case studies from disciplines  ranging from philosophy to physical education, Bruff demonstrates how clickers can increase student engagement and help instructors gauge student learning. While he does address logistical issues such as how to choose from the various vendor options,  the book's main focus is the pedagogical side of clicker use rather than the technical side.  Perhaps most valuable for faculty is his in-depth "taxonomy of clicker questions," in which he defines different types of questions, such as "recall questions," "conceptual thinking questions," and "student perspective questions," offering examples of each and explaining how and why they can be useful for instructors and students. We recommend this book for faculty who are currently using clickers or considering trying them. You can also check out Derek's blog on clickers. Please join us for Derek Bruff's talks on February 7 ("Class Time Reconsidered: Motivating Student Participation and Engagement") and February 8 ("Connecting with Participatory Culture: Teaching with Clickers for Deep Learning").

Recently, many of us at CNDLS have been reading Teaching with Classroom Response Systems: Creating Active Learning Environments. The author, Derek Bruff, who is visiting Georgetown on Feburary 7 and 8, is an assistant director at the Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching.

Recently, many of us at CNDLS have been reading Teaching with Classroom Response Systems: Creating Active Learning Environments. The author, Derek Bruff, who is visiting Georgetown on Feburary 7 and 8, is an assistant director at the Vanderbilt University Center for Teaching. In his book , he explores the many different choices that instructors can make when using classroom response systems, also known as clickers, in their teaching.

Drawing case studies from disciplines  ranging from philosophy to physical education, Bruff demonstrates how clickers can increase student engagement and help instructors gauge student learning. While he does address logistical issues such as how to choose from the various vendor options,  the book’s main focus is the pedagogical side of clicker use rather than the technical side.  Perhaps most valuable for faculty is his in-depth “taxonomy of clicker questions,” in which he defines different types of questions, such as “recall questions,” “conceptual thinking questions,” and “student perspective questions,” offering examples of each and explaining how and why they can be useful for instructors and students.

We recommend this book for faculty who are currently using clickers or considering trying them. You can also check out Derek’s blog on clickers. Please join us for Derek Bruff’s talks on February 7 (“Class Time Reconsidered: Motivating Student Participation and Engagement”) and February 8 (“Connecting with Participatory Culture: Teaching with Clickers for Deep Learning”).