Walking Tour on History of Slavery at Georgetown

On Monday, May 23, Matthew Quallen (SFS '16), a member of the Working Group on Slavery, Memory & Reconciliation, led an historical walking tour of sites on and around campus linked to  the history of slavery at Georgetown. The tour grew out of a project with the John Carroll Scholarship and was offered in April as part of Georgetown’s DC Emancipation Day Symposium. Quallen first took attendees to Freedom Hall, formerly Thomas Mulledy Hall, which now houses the Spirit of Georgetown Residential Academy. "Events in 1838 link Thomas Mulledy at Georgetown to the sale of slaves to plantations in Louisiana," he shared.

With limited time due to the rain, the group headed to a few old campus sites and offered history on Father Healy and Thomas Mulledy to contextualize the 1838 events, and ended with Quallen pointing out the Old College Ground just northwest of present day Red Square. This area, a current construction site, was a segregated burial ground used by Holy Trinity Parish. People there were buried based on race and class.
More information about this history can be found at the Georgetown Slavery Archive, a repository of materials relating to the Maryland Jesuits, Georgetown University, and slavery.

On Monday, May 23, Matthew Quallen (SFS ’16), a member of the Working Group on Slavery, Memory & Reconciliation, led an historical walking tour of sites on and around campus linked to  the history of slavery at Georgetown. The tour grew out of a project with the John Carroll Scholarship and was offered in April as part of Georgetown’s DC Emancipation Day Symposium.

Quallen first took attendees to Freedom Hall, formerly Thomas Mulledy Hall, which now houses the Spirit of Georgetown Residential Academy. “Events in 1838 link Thomas Mulledy at Georgetown to the sale of slaves to plantations in Louisiana,” he shared.

With limited time due to the rain, the group headed to a few old campus sites and offered history on Father Healy and Thomas Mulledy to contextualize the 1838 events, and ended with Quallen pointing out the Old College Ground just northwest of present day Red Square. This area, a current construction site, was a segregated burial ground used by Holy Trinity Parish. People there were buried based on race and class.

More information about this history can be found at the Georgetown Slavery Archive, a repository of materials relating to the Maryland Jesuits, Georgetown University, and slavery.