Contemplation and Learning

Daryl Nardick, Director of Strategic Project Integration, shares the following thoughts on a recent conference she attended: During the last week of September, I attended a gathering of 150 faculty members from campuses as far away as Doha at Amherst’s beautiful autumn-laden campus to discuss how to engage students in a way that will be more meaningful to their learning and their lives. This conversation was inspired by the Association of Contemplative Mind in Higher Education (ACMHE), the group responsible for convening the conference, the second annual gathering of this kind. Faculty from all disciplines, including several from economics, discussed how through the use of reflection, silence, journaling, ritualized writing, yoga and other related methods, students were able to draw upon their emotional, psychological, physiological and spiritual sides to enhance their learning in and beyond the classroom.   Many faculty expressed the struggles they face when trying to explain the (student learning) benefits of adopting these practices to their colleagues and how collegial resistance might be overcome. These discussions certainly reminded me of the trajectory our Engelhard Project for Connecting Life and Learning has taken and the impact that a few devoted believers can have on institutional change and student learning. For more information on the ACMHE’s programs please visit this site.

Daryl Nardick, Director of Strategic Project Integration, shares the following thoughts on a recent conference she attended.

Daryl Nardick, Director of Strategic Project Integration, shares the following thoughts on a recent conference she attended:

During the last week of September, I attended a gathering of 150 faculty members from campuses as far away as Doha at Amherst’s beautiful autumn-laden campus to discuss how to engage students in a way that will be more meaningful to their learning and their lives. This conversation was inspired by the Association of Contemplative Mind in Higher Education (ACMHE), the group responsible for convening the conference, the second annual gathering of this kind.

Faculty from all disciplines, including several from economics, discussed how through the use of reflection, silence, journaling, ritualized writing, yoga and other related methods, students were able to draw upon their emotional, psychological, physiological and spiritual sides to enhance their learning in and beyond the classroom.   Many faculty expressed the struggles they face when trying to explain the (student learning) benefits of adopting these practices to their colleagues and how collegial resistance might be overcome. These discussions certainly reminded me of the trajectory our Engelhard Project for Connecting Life and Learning has taken and the impact that a few devoted believers can have on institutional change and student learning.

For more information on the ACMHE’s programs please visit this site.

Featured Program: Mid-Semester Teaching Feedback Sessions

As part of our work in the area of assessment, CNDLS offers Mid-Semester Teaching Feedback sessions.  These sessions give faculty the opportunity to solicit students’ opinions on a class as it’s still going on, rather than waiting for end-of-semester evaluations or surveys. CNDLS staff members work closely with the instructor to formulate questions specific to their course, spend a class period facilitating the student sessions, and then discuss the results with the instructor. If you're interested in learning more about Mid-Semester Teaching Feedback sessions, or if you'd like to schedule one for your course, please contact CNDLS Program Coordinator Anna Kruse.

As part of our work in the area of assessment, CNDLS offers Mid-Semester Teaching Feedback sessions. These sessions give faculty the opportunity to solicit students’ opinions on a class as it’s still going on, rather than waiting for end-of-semester evaluations or surveys.

As part of our work in the area of assessment, CNDLS offers Mid-Semester Teaching Feedback sessions.  These sessions give faculty the opportunity to solicit students’ opinions on a class as it’s still going on, rather than waiting for end-of-semester evaluations or surveys. CNDLS staff members work closely with the instructor to formulate questions specific to their course, spend a class period facilitating the student sessions, and then discuss the results with the instructor.

If you’re interested in learning more about Mid-Semester Teaching Feedback sessions, or if you’d like to schedule one for your course, please contact CNDLS Program Coordinator Anna Kruse.

Evaluating Student Work on Blogs

In this post on the Georgetown University Digital Commons Labs blog, Program Coordinator Anna Kruse shares some strategies for evaluating student work on course and research blogs. She points out some useful resources, including rubrics that you might adapt for your own teaching.

In this post on the Georgetown University Digital Commons Labs blog, Program Coordinator Anna Kruse shares some strategies for evaluating student work on course and research blogs. She points out some useful resources, including rubrics that you might adapt for your own teaching.

In this post on the Georgetown University Digital Commons Labs blog, Program Coordinator Anna Kruse shares some strategies for evaluating student work on course and research blogs. She points out some useful resources, including rubrics that you might adapt for your own teaching.

Fall 2010 Digital Commons Update

Check out this update on Fall 2010 from Digital Commons Project Assistant Yong Lee. In his post on the Digital Commons Labs blog, Yong shares some numbers on current course blog and wiki use along with a preview of some of this semester's upcoming events.

Check out this update on Fall 2010 from Digital Commons Project Assistant Yong Lee. In his post on the Digital Commons Labs blog, Yong shares some numbers on current course blog and wiki use along with a preview of some of this semester's upcoming events.

Check out this update on Fall 2010 from Digital Commons Project Assistant Yong Lee. In his post on the Digital Commons Labs blog, Yong shares some numbers on current course blog and wiki use along with a preview of some of this semester’s upcoming events.

Elluminate Workshops

If you're intrigued by the synchronous communication tool Elluminate, you may want to attend one or more of these upcoming workshops. To learn more about how Elluminate could be useful in your teaching, check out the Academic Continuity website, which includes examples from faculty.

If you've been wanting to learn more about the synchronous communication tool Elluminate, you may want to attend one or more of these upcoming workshops.

If you’re intrigued by the synchronous communication tool Elluminate, you may want to attend one or more of these upcoming workshops.

To learn more about how Elluminate could be useful in your teaching, check out the Academic Continuity website, which includes examples from faculty.

Conversations on Teaching and Learning with Web 2.0 Technologies

This fall, in collaboration with the Gelardin New Media Center, we are pleased to present a series of informal conversations on Teaching and Learning with Web 2.0 Technologies. These sessions are open to all Georgetown faculty, students, and staff, and will take place in the Dubin Room, Lauinger Library.  The first session is this Friday. For details on all of the sessions, please visit our Workshops page. Harnessing the Cloud: Exploring Web Applications for Academic Projects Friday, September 17, 3 p.m. Facilitators: Per Hoel (GNMC), Rob Pongsajapan (CNDLS) The internet – called the “cloud” by many – offers an amazing variety of groundbreaking applications that can run directly in your browser. “Cloudware” is fundamentally challenging the way we think about using programs on our computers – rather than purchasing, installing, and running a program on your computer, you can access these applications on any computer’s browser, and most are free to use. Join Per and Rob for this 1-hour session that will feature 5 web apps, including a Photoshop-like application and one that lets you edit video and audio – all online, and all for free! The session will start with a short demonstration followed by interactive play and brainstorming about academic uses.

This fall, in collaboration with the Gelardin New Media Center, we are pleased to present a series of informal conversations on Teaching and Learning with Web 2.0 Technologies.

This fall, in collaboration with the Gelardin New Media Center, we are pleased to present a series of informal conversations on Teaching and Learning with Web 2.0 Technologies. These sessions are open to all Georgetown faculty, students, and staff, and will take place in the Dubin Room, Lauinger Library.  The first session is this Friday. For details on all of the sessions, please visit our Workshops page.

Harnessing the Cloud: Exploring Web Applications for Academic Projects
Friday, September 17, 3 p.m.
Facilitators: Per Hoel (GNMC), Rob Pongsajapan (CNDLS)

The internet – called the “cloud” by many – offers an amazing variety of groundbreaking applications that can run directly in your browser. “Cloudware” is fundamentally challenging the way we think about using programs on our computers – rather than purchasing, installing, and running a program on your computer, you can access these applications on any computer’s browser, and most are free to use.

Join Per and Rob for this 1-hour session that will feature 5 web apps, including a Photoshop-like application and one that lets you edit video and audio – all online, and all for free! The session will start with a short demonstration followed by interactive play and brainstorming about academic uses.

Project Rebirth

As we pause to remember the events of September 11, 2001, we invite you to learn more about Project Rebirth.  The film Rebirth, directed by Georgetown alumnus Jim Whitaker (C'90), is a documentary chronicling the recovery of ten people coping with the aftermath of 9/11 and the redevelopment of the World Trade Center site. CNDLS is collaborating with Columbia's Center for New Media Teaching and Learning to design educational applications for the incredible interview footage collected for the film. A Message of Remembrance from Project Rebirth can be found here.

As we pause to remember the events of September 11, 2001, we invite you to learn more about Project Rebirth.

As we pause to remember the events of September 11, 2001, we invite you to learn more about Project Rebirth.  The film Rebirth, directed by Georgetown alumnus Jim Whitaker (C’90), is a documentary chronicling the recovery of ten people coping with the aftermath of 9/11 and the redevelopment of the World Trade Center site. CNDLS is collaborating with Columbia’s Center for New Media Teaching and Learning to design educational applications for the incredible interview footage collected for the film.

A Message of Remembrance from Project Rebirth can be found here.

GU Alumnus Blogs about “Learning Shift”

Georgetown alumnus Christian Talbot, who chairs the English department at Regis High School in Manhattan, writes about education in his blog Excellence in Teaching / Teaching Excellence. Recently, he reflected on the Georgetown Magazine article "The Learning Shift," which explored various ways that Georgetown faculty are shifting from a focus on teaching to a focus on learning. Talbot asks his readers to examine their attitudes toward experimentation and innovation in the classroom. He writes:

"We don’t have to reconstruct every single lesson around the idea of student-centered, 'intrinsically experimental' work.  But as the new school year approaches, it might be fruitful to ask yourself, 'In the first week of classes, can I shift my approach in just one of my lessons so that it centers on student experimentation and participation?'"

Read the full post here and here.

Georgetown alumnus Christian Talbot, who chairs the English department at Regis High School in Manhattan, writes about education in his blog Excellence in Teaching / Teaching Excellence. Recently, he reflected on the Georgetown Magazine article “The Learning Shift,” which explored various ways that Georgetown faculty are shifting from a focus on teaching to a focus on learning. Talbot asks his readers to examine their attitudes toward experimentation and innovation in the classroom. He writes:

“We don’t have to reconstruct every single lesson around the idea of student-centered, ‘intrinsically experimental’ work.  But as the new school year approaches, it might be fruitful to ask yourself, ‘In the first week of classes, can I shift my approach in just one of my lessons so that it centers on student experimentation and participation?'”

Read the full post here and here.

Student Engagement in Large Classes

The Spring 2010 Provost’s Seminar on Teaching and Learning offered opportunities for faculty to participate in ongoing discussions about teaching, learning, and the curriculum, building on the Call to Action: Curriculum and Learning at Georgetown and the 2009 Fall Faculty Convocation’s focus on teaching and learning. This panel discussion featured several Georgetown faculty members who shared strategies they have used to encourage student engagement in large classes, including blogs, online discussion boards, and clickers.

This panel discussion featured several Georgetown faculty members who shared strategies they have used to encourage student engagement in large classes, including blogs, online discussion boards, and clickers.

The Spring 2010 Provost’s Seminar on Teaching and Learning offered opportunities for faculty to participate in ongoing discussions about teaching, learning, and the curriculum, building on the Call to Action: Curriculum and Learning at Georgetown and the 2009 Fall Faculty Convocation’s focus on teaching and learning. This panel discussion featured several Georgetown faculty members who shared strategies they have used to encourage student engagement in large classes, including blogs, online discussion boards, and clickers.

Announcing the Engelhard Endowment for Engaged Learning

CNDLS, in partnership with the Office of Student Affairs and Sally Engelhard Pingree, is pleased to announce the Engelhard Endowment for Engaged Learning, made possible by a generous gift from the Charles Engelhard Foundation. Building on the work of the successful Engelhard Project, the Endowment will significantly broaden the scope and depth of our research on engaged learning. In addition to enabling the continuation of the Engelhard Project, the endowment will fund ongoing curricular experimentation and establish an annual Institute for the Study of Engaged Learning.  A brief article on the Endowment can be found here.

CNDLS, in partnership with the Office of Student Affairs and Sally Engelhard Pingree, is pleased to announce the Engelhard Endowment for Engaged Learning, made possible by a generous gift from the Charles Engelhard Foundation.

CNDLS, in partnership with the Office of Student Affairs and Sally Engelhard Pingree, is pleased to announce the Engelhard Endowment for Engaged Learning, made possible by a generous gift from the Charles Engelhard Foundation.

Building on the work of the successful Engelhard Project, the Endowment will significantly broaden the scope and depth of our research on engaged learning. In addition to enabling the continuation of the Engelhard Project, the endowment will fund ongoing curricular experimentation and establish an annual Institute for the Study of Engaged Learning.  A brief article on the Endowment can be found here.