Randy Bass on “Connecting Life and Learning”

Last week, CNDLS' Randy Bass spoke at Montclair State University on "Connecting Life and Learning: Teaching the Whole Person." He described how the Engelhard Project aims to help faculty and students find organic connections between academic course material and issues of mental health and wellness. Slides from his presentation can be found on our Resources from Recent Events page. To find out more about the Engelhard Project, check out the project website, which includes videos, a report on the project, resources, and profiles of Engelhard faculty fellows.

Last week, CNDLS' Randy Bass spoke at Montclair State University on "Connecting Life and Learning: Teaching the Whole Person."

Last week, CNDLS’ Randy Bass spoke at Montclair State University on “Connecting Life and Learning: Teaching the Whole Person.” He described how the Engelhard Project aims to help faculty and students find organic connections between academic course material and issues of mental health and wellness. Slides from his presentation can be found on our Resources from Recent Events page.

To find out more about the Engelhard Project, check out the project website, which includes videos, a report on the project, resources, and profiles of Engelhard faculty fellows.

Language Learning Conference Starts Tomorrow!

Wednesday marks the first day of the MAALLT-SEALLT conference "Our Changing Environments: Cultivating New Spaces, Tools, and Ideas in Language Learning." Wednesday's pre-conference sessions will include a number of presentations by CNDLS staff and others on topics such as writing technologies, data visualization, and digital research portfolios. Thursday morning will feature a keynote talk by CNDLS' Randy Bass on "The Problem of Learning in the Post-Course Era." More information, including session abstracts, can be found here.

Wednesday marks the first day of the MAALLT-SEALLT conference "Our Changing Environments: Cultivating New Spaces, Tools, and Ideas in Language Learning."

Wednesday marks the first day of the MAALLT-SEALLT conference “Our Changing Environments: Cultivating New Spaces, Tools, and Ideas in Language Learning.” Wednesday’s pre-conference sessions will include a number of presentations by CNDLS staff and others on topics such as writing technologies, data visualization, and digital research portfolios.

Thursday morning will feature a keynote talk by CNDLS’ Randy Bass on “The Problem of Learning in the Post-Course Era.”

More information, including session abstracts, can be found here.

Making Connections with ePortfolios

Creating ePortfolios, which are digital collections of student work, helps students to articulate their academic goals, make connections across disparate courses and disciplines, and reflect back on work done throughout their academic careers. Students' ePortfolios can also function as electronic CVs, allowing students to showcase their work in a variety of media to prospective employers. At Georgetown, ePortfolios have proved useful in a wide variety of programs and departments.  For example, Natalie Khazaal's students film themselves speaking Arabic for their ePortfolios. As she explains it, "the ePortfolios speak volumes to employers. They are a huge advantage over the paper résumé."  Betsi Stephen's STIA students work on their ePortfolios over their entire Georgetown careers, which, as she says, "allows them to see the arc of their work and how it progresses over time.  They're able to make connections inside and outside the classroom, connecting their coursework to their study-abroad experiences, internships, and more."  Fellows in the Department of Family Medicine, with help from fellowship director Kim Bullock and department administrator Kathleen McNamara, use ePortfolios to draw connections among the clinical, teaching, and leadership components of their fellowships. To learn more, visit the Georgetown University Digital Commons "Get Ideas" page on ePortfolios, where you'll find examples, tips, tools, and resources.

Creating ePortfolios, which are digital collections of student work, helps students to articulate their academic goals, make connections across disparate courses and disciplines, and reflect back on work done throughout their academic careers.

Creating ePortfolios, which are digital collections of student work, helps students to articulate their academic goals, make connections across disparate courses and disciplines, and reflect back on work done throughout their academic careers. Students’ ePortfolios can also function as electronic CVs, allowing students to showcase their work in a variety of media to prospective employers.

At Georgetown, ePortfolios have proved useful in a wide variety of programs and departments.  For example, Natalie Khazaal’s students film themselves speaking Arabic for their ePortfolios. As she explains it, “the ePortfolios speak volumes to employers. They are a huge advantage over the paper résumé.”  Betsi Stephen’s STIA students work on their ePortfolios over their entire Georgetown careers, which, as she says, “allows them to see the arc of their work and how it progresses over time.  They’re able to make connections inside and outside the classroom, connecting their coursework to their study-abroad experiences, internships, and more.”  Fellows in the Department of Family Medicine, with help from fellowship director Kim Bullock and department administrator Kathleen McNamara, use ePortfolios to draw connections among the clinical, teaching, and leadership components of their fellowships.

To learn more, visit the Georgetown University Digital Commons “Get Ideas” page on ePortfolios, where you’ll find examples, tips, tools, and resources.

Preview of Upcoming Language Conference

Peter Janssens, CNDLS' Associate Director for Instructional Resources and President of the Mid-Atlantic Association for Language Learning Technology, offers the following preview of the upcoming MAALLT-SEALLT conference. The conference will take place at Georgetown from March 10-13.
Spring break will be an exciting time for faculty in languages and linguistics! While the Linguistics and Arabic Departments are hosting the Georgetown University Round Table (GURT) conference, CNDLS is hosting a biannual language teaching technology conference, a joint effort of the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Associations for Language Learning Technology (MAALLT and SEALLT).
The conference begins on Wednesday, March 10 with a day of pre-conference workshops presented by the CNDLS staff in conjunction with the Gelardin New Media Center staff and foreign language faculty. Topics include language curriculum development, survey design, writing technologies, social bookmarking, and digital research portfolios, all with an eye on potential applications for language teaching and learning. Thursday through Saturday morning, participants will have a choice between four concurrent sessions covering topics such as art and photography in the foreign language classroom, ePortfolios, instructional podcasts, student self-assessment through the social web, online chat rooms for language learning and cultural understanding, an online student speech contest, mobile quizzes, interactive whiteboards, clickers in the language classroom, online communities of practice for service learning, online placement testing, virtual cultural events, modalities for adult learning, and many more.
Presenters from universities and colleges in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast areas, including Georgetown's own departments of Arabic, French, German, Italian, and Spanish and Portuguese, will join faculty and instructional technologists from around the country and abroad (including colleagues from Qatar). Of particular note are two morning plenary talks, one by CNDLS' Randy Bass and one by Kevin Gaugler, a professor of Spanish at Marist College.
CNDLS has worked closely with the Linguistics and Arabic departments on coordinating aspects of the MAALLT-SEALLT and GURT conferences, with a shared exhibition space in the Intercultural Center and a joint reception on Friday evening. The conference sessions are open to Georgetown faculty and graduate students to attend. (Only the the pre-conference workshops and Friday's banquet require a payment.) Please see the registration page for more information.
We look forward to an exciting and stimulating spring "break!"

Over spring break, CNDLS is hosting a biannual language teaching technology conference, a joint effort of the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Associations for Language Learning Technology (MAALLT and SEALLT).

Peter Janssens, CNDLS’ Associate Director for Instructional Resources and President of the Mid-Atlantic Association for Language Learning Technology, offers the following preview of the upcoming MAALLT-SEALLT conference. The conference will take place at Georgetown from March 10-13.

Spring break will be an exciting time for faculty in languages and linguistics! While the Linguistics and Arabic Departments are hosting the Georgetown University Round Table (GURT) conference, CNDLS is hosting a biannual language teaching technology conference, a joint effort of the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast Associations for Language Learning Technology (MAALLT and SEALLT).

The conference begins on Wednesday, March 10 with a day of pre-conference workshops presented by the CNDLS staff in conjunction with the Gelardin New Media Center staff and foreign language faculty. Topics include language curriculum development, survey design, writing technologies, social bookmarking, and digital research portfolios, all with an eye on potential applications for language teaching and learning. Thursday through Saturday morning, participants will have a choice between four concurrent sessions covering topics such as art and photography in the foreign language classroom, ePortfolios, instructional podcasts, student self-assessment through the social web, online chat rooms for language learning and cultural understanding, an online student speech contest, mobile quizzes, interactive whiteboards, clickers in the language classroom, online communities of practice for service learning, online placement testing, virtual cultural events, modalities for adult learning, and many more.

Presenters from universities and colleges in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast areas, including Georgetown’s own departments of Arabic, French, German, Italian, and Spanish and Portuguese, will join faculty and instructional technologists from around the country and abroad (including colleagues from Qatar). Of particular note are two morning plenary talks, one by CNDLS’ Randy Bass and one by Kevin Gaugler, a professor of Spanish at Marist College.

CNDLS has worked closely with the Linguistics and Arabic departments on coordinating aspects of the MAALLT-SEALLT and GURT conferences, with a shared exhibition space in the Intercultural Center and a joint reception on Friday evening. The conference sessions are open to Georgetown faculty and graduate students to attend. (Only the the pre-conference workshops and Friday’s banquet require a payment.) Please see the registration page for more information.

We look forward to an exciting and stimulating spring “break!”

William Sullivan on “Shaping the Life of the Mind for Practice”

William Sullivan, Senior Scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, will speak on Tuesday, March 2 at 4pm in the Murray Room (Lauinger Library, 5th floor).  In his presentation, titled "Shaping the Life of the Mind for Practice," Sullivan will focus on on the concept of “practical reason” as a “new agenda for higher education,” one that prioritizes and designs for curricular approaches that help students develop reasoned and responsible judgment in conditions of uncertainty. For more background on Sullivan's work, and contact information to RSVP for the presentation, please see this page.

William Sullivan, Senior Scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, will give a presentation on "Shaping the Life of the Mind for Practice" on Tuesday afternoon.

William Sullivan, Senior Scholar at the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, will speak on Tuesday, March 2 at 4pm in the Murray Room (Lauinger Library, 5th floor).  In his presentation, titled “Shaping the Life of the Mind for Practice,” Sullivan will focus on on the concept of “practical reason” as a “new agenda for higher education,” one that prioritizes and designs for curricular approaches that help students develop reasoned and responsible judgment in conditions of uncertainty.

For more background on Sullivan’s work, and contact information to RSVP for the presentation, please see this page.

Tuesday, March 2: Workshop on Social Bookmarking

Please join us for a workshop on social bookmarking tomorrow at 11am in the Murray Room at Lauinger Library. The workshop, which will be led by Beth Marhanka (Gelardin New Media Center) and Theresa Schlafly (CNDLS), is part of a series of workshops focusing on educational uses for Web 2.0 tools. Topics for upcoming workshops include Data Visualization and GeoInfo / Google Earth. For more information or to register, please visit the CNDLS workshops page.

Please join us for a workshop on social bookmarking tomorrow at 11am in the Murray Room at Lauinger Library.

Please join us for a workshop on social bookmarking tomorrow at 11am in the Murray Room at Lauinger Library. The workshop, which will be led by Beth Marhanka (Gelardin New Media Center) and Theresa Schlafly (CNDLS), is part of a series of workshops focusing on educational uses for Web 2.0 tools. Topics for upcoming workshops include Data Visualization and GeoInfo / Google Earth.

For more information or to register, please visit the CNDLS workshops page.

MyDante in the News

A new video game based on Dante's Inferno has gotten a lot of press lately. Two reporters approached Georgetown's Frank Ambrosio (Philosophy) to get his reaction to the game's depiction of Dante's poem.  In his course on Dante and the Christian Imagination, Ambrosio uses MyDante, an interactive site developed at CNDLS and devoted to the contemplative reading of Dante's Divine Comedy.  Ambrosio is quoted and MyDante is mentioned in the Washington Post and USA Today. To learn more about MyDante, or to sign up for an account, please visit dante.georgetown.edu. You can read more about how Ambrosio uses MyDante in his teaching here.

A new video game based on Dante's Inferno has gotten a lot of press lately. Two reporters approached Georgetown's Frank Ambrosio (Philosophy) to get his reaction to the game's depiction of Dante's poem.

A new video game based on Dante’s Inferno has gotten a lot of press lately. Two reporters approached Georgetown’s Frank Ambrosio (Philosophy) to get his reaction to the game’s depiction of Dante’s poem.  In his course on Dante and the Christian Imagination, Ambrosio uses MyDante, an interactive site developed at CNDLS and devoted to the contemplative reading of Dante’s Divine Comedy.  Ambrosio is quoted and MyDante is mentioned in the Washington Post and USA Today.

To learn more about MyDante, or to sign up for an account, please visit dante.georgetown.edu. You can read more about how Ambrosio uses MyDante in his teaching here.

Friday, February 19th: Symposium on Social Media in the Classroom

The Tenth Scholarly Communication Symposium will feature three speakers who are deeply involved with social media on their campuses. CNDLS' Eddie Maloney will join Gerry McCartney (Purdue University) and Ulises Mejias (State University of New York at Oswego) to discuss the implications of social media on teaching and learning. The symposium will take place from 10:00 to 11:30 in the Murray Room in Lauinger Library. For more information, please see this event description.  Please RSVP to William Olsen at wco4@georgetown.edu.

The Tenth Scholarly Communication Symposium will feature three speakers who are deeply involved with social media on their campuses. CNDLS' Eddie Maloney will join Gerry McCartney (Purdue University) and Ulises Mejias (State University of New York at Oswego) to discuss the implications of social media on teaching and learning.

The Tenth Scholarly Communication Symposium will feature three speakers who are deeply involved with social media on their campuses. CNDLS’ Eddie Maloney will join Gerry McCartney (Purdue University) and Ulises Mejias (State University of New York at Oswego) to discuss the implications of social media on teaching and learning.

The symposium will take place from 10:00 to 11:30 in the Murray Room in Lauinger Library. For more information, please see this event description.  Please RSVP to William Olsen at wco4@georgetown.edu.

Update on the Doyle Initiative

CNDLS Graduate Associate Hillá Meller shares the following update on the Doyle Initiative: During 2009-2010, the inaugural year of the Doyle Building Tolerance Initiative, we have been working with nine Doyle Faculty Fellows on strategies for incorporating themes of difference and diversity into the academic content of regular undergraduate courses at Georgetown. Fellows have been meeting monthly to discuss progress in their classes and exchange ideas about their pedagogies. The fellows have also met with several representatives from resource centers on campus. In December, William J. Doyle (C’72) visited campus and enjoyed a full day of programming and meetings with students and faculty who are involved in the initiative. He was able to share his vision for the initiative, and was impressed to hear about all the work that has been done so far, both in and out of the classroom. We are currently accepting applications for the 2010-2011 faculty fellowships. Information on becoming a Doyle Faculty Fellow can be found on our newly launched Doyle Initiative website. We hope that the website, which will serve as a hub of information and reflection about the initiative’s different components, will bring together students and faculty who are working on issues of diversity on Georgetown’s campus and beyond.

Fall 2009 was the inaugural semester of the Doyle Building Tolerance Initiative. We have been working with nine Doyle Faculty Fellows on redesigning their courses to incorporate themes of difference and diversity into their courses.

CNDLS Graduate Associate Hillá Meller shares the following update on the Doyle Initiative:

During 2009-2010, the inaugural year of the Doyle Building Tolerance Initiative, we have been working with nine Doyle Faculty Fellows on strategies for incorporating themes of difference and diversity into the academic content of regular undergraduate courses at Georgetown. Fellows have been meeting monthly to discuss progress in their classes and exchange ideas about their pedagogies. The fellows have also met with several representatives from resource centers on campus.

In December, William J. Doyle (C’72) visited campus and enjoyed a full day of programming and meetings with students and faculty who are involved in the initiative. He was able to share his vision for the initiative, and was impressed to hear about all the work that has been done so far, both in and out of the classroom.

We are currently accepting applications for the 2010-2011 faculty fellowships. Information on becoming a Doyle Faculty Fellow can be found on our newly launched Doyle Initiative website. We hope that the website, which will serve as a hub of information and reflection about the initiative’s different components, will bring together students and faculty who are working on issues of diversity on Georgetown’s campus and beyond.

Today: Rosenzweig Forum on the Digital Humanities

'Negotiating the Cultural Turn(s): Subjectivity, Sustainability, and Authority in the Digital Humanities' Timothy Powell (University of Pennsylvania) and Bethany Nowviskie (University of Virginia) will present and lead a discussion on digital humanities. Powell will discuss his work creating digital archives of Ojibwe cultural materials, and Nowviskie will share her work with NINES, SpecLab, and the Scholars' Lab at the University of Virginia. 4:30 pm, Murray Room, Lauinger Library Click here for more information on this event.

Today at 4:30pm, Timothy Powell (University of Pennsylvania) and Bethany Nowviskie (University of Virginia) will present and lead a discussion on digital humanities.

‘Negotiating the Cultural Turn(s): Subjectivity, Sustainability, and Authority in the Digital Humanities’

Timothy Powell (University of Pennsylvania) and Bethany Nowviskie (University of Virginia) will present and lead a discussion on digital humanities. Powell will discuss his work creating digital archives of Ojibwe cultural materials, and Nowviskie will share her work with NINES, SpecLab, and the Scholars’ Lab at the University of Virginia.

4:30 pm, Murray Room, Lauinger Library

Click here for more information on this event.