Intersectionality and Students of Color at Georgetown

In "Who Are Georgetown Students," led by Daviree Velázquez and Devita Bishundat of the Center for Multicultural Equity and Access, what began as an overview of statistics surrounding Georgetown undergraduate students of color, captured through admissions data, was re-illuminated through a lens of critical social theories, supplemented by personal narratives. Populations such as first generation college students and high financial need students were conceptually presented to attendees, with a thorough explanation of intersectionality as an appropriate theoretical framework allowing all facets of an individual student’s identity to affect their experience on campus. A series of case studies was presented to attendees to work through in groups, comprising anonymized student narratives of concerns having to do with such issues as imposter syndrome, stereotype threat, onlyness, internalized oppression, and microaggressions. As many of the Doyle IPC cohort were in attendance at this workshop, this useful new terminology was taken up by them for much of the remainder of the week in describing their personal goals for inclusive pedagogical practices.

In “Who Are Georgetown Students,” led by Daviree Velázquez and Devita Bishundat of the Center for Multicultural Equity and Access, what began as an overview of statistics surrounding Georgetown undergraduate students of color, captured through admissions data, was re-illuminated through a lens of critical social theories, supplemented by personal narratives. Populations such as first generation college students and high financial need students were conceptually presented to attendees, with a thorough explanation of intersectionality as an appropriate theoretical framework allowing all facets of an individual student’s identity to affect their experience on campus.

A series of case studies was presented to attendees to work through in groups, comprising anonymized student narratives of concerns having to do with such issues as imposter syndrome, stereotype threat, onlyness, internalized oppression, and microaggressions. As many of the Doyle IPC cohort were in attendance at this workshop, this useful new terminology was taken up by them for much of the remainder of the week in describing their personal goals for inclusive pedagogical practices.