Inclusive Pedagogy Take-Aways

The final gathering of the Doyle IPC offered participants the chance to use the full day to think through what they had learned and experienced throughout the week. The day began with a discussion of how participants are atypical and how they are surprising practitioners in their field. This discussion provided some groundwork for the next activity, which was an opportunity for attendees to share with a partner their drafted revisions to syllabi learning goals for an upcoming course, consisting of both their personal goals for the success of the course and their expectations for student outcomes through course completion. As faculty came from a diversity of departments to participate in this workshop, course goals presented were themselves diverse, yet all displayed an underlying theme of inclusive pedagogy.

In the middle of the day, previous Doyle faculty fellows presented their courses as examples of how to implement new techniques and considerations learned over the week. These fellows included Erika Seamon (American Studies), Deb Sevigny (Performing Arts), Mark Giordano (STIA), Charles McNelis (Classics), and Sabrina Wesley-Nero (EDIJ). The question period that allowed the attendees to further converse with the former Doyle fellows brought up such issues as how to measure the success of this an undertaking, which is still in many cases a work in progress.
The rest of the afternoon allowed participants to share with the Doyle IPC facilitators their feedback from the week of sessions and included additional team-building exercises that encouraged attendees to think about the role of inclusive pedagogy in institutional and cultural change, strategies and skills for action, and the intersection of social and professional identities.

The final gathering of the Doyle IPC offered participants the chance to use the full day to think through what they had learned and experienced throughout the week. The day began with a discussion of how participants are atypical and how they are surprising practitioners in their field. This discussion provided some groundwork for the next activity, which was an opportunity for attendees to share with a partner their drafted revisions to syllabi learning goals for an upcoming course, consisting of both their personal goals for the success of the course and their expectations for student outcomes through course completion. As faculty came from a diversity of departments to participate in this workshop, course goals presented were themselves diverse, yet all displayed an underlying theme of inclusive pedagogy.

In the middle of the day, previous Doyle faculty fellows presented their courses as examples of how to implement new techniques and considerations learned over the week. These fellows included Erika Seamon (American Studies), Deb Sevigny (Performing Arts), Mark Giordano (STIA), Charles McNelis (Classics), and Sabrina Wesley-Nero (EDIJ). The question period that allowed the attendees to further converse with the former Doyle fellows brought up such issues as how to measure the success of this an undertaking, which is still in many cases a work in progress.

The rest of the afternoon allowed participants to share with the Doyle IPC facilitators their feedback from the week of sessions and included additional team-building exercises that encouraged attendees to think about the role of inclusive pedagogy in institutional and cultural change, strategies and skills for action, and the intersection of social and professional identities.