Curricular Innovation Social Hour

The first day of TLISI 2016 came to a close on Monday, May 23rd, with a social hour focused on curricular innovation at Georgetown. In the Healey Family Student Center Great Room, faculty and staff conversed with one another about exciting curricular changes occurring around campus. Kathryn Temple (English) showcased how the university is rethinking doctoral education in the humanities. Her work, in addition to that presented by seven other faculty, is part of a larger project called "Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers," a national program led by the Modern Language Association and funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Together with two other institutions—the University of California Humanities Research Institute and Arizona State University—Georgetown is working to prepare language and literature doctoral students for both academic and non-academic careers by expanding their studies beyond the university. Many professors utilized the social hour to showcase their efforts to dramatically change the humanities at Georgetown. Mary Helen Depree (German), for example, displayed a compelling course new to her department. In "Private Lives/Public VirtuesInterpreting The Long 18th Century," students attempt to frame new ways of thinking about the complicated distinctions between public and private. While structured with a specific emphasis on the 18th Century, the interdisciplinary course exposes the relationship between cultural norms and individual experiences far beyond a single century. The Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching and Service (CSJ) and the Center for Multicultural Equity and Access (CMEA) joined Connected Academics in presenting, although their focus was on transforming pedagogy at the undergraduate level. Amanda Munroe, Social Justice Curriculum and Pedagogy Coordinator at the CSJ, talked with attendees about community-based learning (CBL) courses, social justice course infusions, and "UNXD 130 CBL: Social Action," a one-credit opportunity for students to tie classroom learning to community-based work. Tabling for CMEA, Daviree Velázquez and Leslie Hinkson (Sociology) spoke with faculty about A Different Dialogue, a program aimed at helping students foster positive, meaningful, and sustained cross-group relationships through facilitated dialogue about difference. CNDLS is thankful to those who contributed to a successful and enlightening social hour, especially to our presenters, who shared their knowledge and time with us.

The first day of TLISI 2016 came to a close on Monday, May 23rd, with a social hour focused on curricular innovation at Georgetown. In the Healey Family Student Center Great Room, faculty and staff conversed with one another about exciting curricular changes occurring around campus.

Kathryn Temple (English) showcased how the university is rethinking doctoral education in the humanities. Her work, in addition to that presented by seven other faculty, is part of a larger project called “Connected Academics: Preparing Doctoral Students of Language and Literature for a Variety of Careers,” a national program led by the Modern Language Association and funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Together with two other institutions—the University of California Humanities Research Institute and Arizona State University—Georgetown is working to prepare language and literature doctoral students for both academic and non-academic careers by expanding their studies beyond the university.

Many professors utilized the social hour to showcase their efforts to dramatically change the humanities at Georgetown. Mary Helen Depree (German), for example, displayed a compelling course new to her department. In “Private Lives/Public VirtuesInterpreting The Long 18th Century,” students attempt to frame new ways of thinking about the complicated distinctions between public and private. While structured with a specific emphasis on the 18th Century, the interdisciplinary course exposes the relationship between cultural norms and individual experiences far beyond a single century.

The Center for Social Justice Research, Teaching and Service (CSJ) and the Center for Multicultural Equity and Access (CMEA) joined Connected Academics in presenting, although their focus was on transforming pedagogy at the undergraduate level. Amanda Munroe, Social Justice Curriculum and Pedagogy Coordinator at the CSJ, talked with attendees about community-based learning (CBL) courses, social justice course infusions, and “UNXD 130 CBL: Social Action,” a one-credit opportunity for students to tie classroom learning to community-based work. Tabling for CMEA, Daviree Velázquez and Leslie Hinkson (Sociology) spoke with faculty about A Different Dialogue, a program aimed at helping students foster positive, meaningful, and sustained cross-group relationships through facilitated dialogue about difference.

CNDLS is thankful to those who contributed to a successful and enlightening social hour, especially to our presenters, who shared their knowledge and time with us.