Bringing Together Current Experiences and Previous Content with Technology

"Technology-Enhanced Learning: A Step-by-Step Approach to Making an Impactful Change in Your Course" kicked off on Tuesday afternoon with the workshop facilitators getting to know the audience, divided equally between Georgetown faculty and staff members. Jennifer Lubkin Chávez—Program Manager for Technology Enhanced Learning at CNDLS—then asked the audience to consider what sort of learners they wanted to target with technology in the classroom. Before proceeding, she asked how we might formulate teaching tasks based on the many different types of learners we might encounter. Students, Lubkin Chávez explained, need a link between the previous content they have learned and their current experiences in the world; for many, technology-enhanced learning can be what brings these two fields together. She went on to introduce a variety of tools educators can use in the classroom, including the active learning platform Echo360, and the workshop quickly transitioned into a structured Q&A between participants, Lubkin Chávez, and Brian Boston, Academic Technology and Internet Development Coordinator at CNDLS. Thinking critically of our own classes, we considered the many different ways technology could fit and enhance our individualized instruction. The remainder of the time was spent as a very helpful workshop, in which participants learned, experimented with, and questioned the different forms of technology available to Georgetown faculty and staff members.

“Technology-Enhanced Learning: A Step-by-Step Approach to Making an Impactful Change in Your Course” kicked off on Tuesday afternoon with the workshop facilitators getting to know the audience, divided equally between Georgetown faculty and staff members. Jennifer Lubkin Chávez—Program Manager for Technology Enhanced Learning at CNDLS—then asked the audience to consider what sort of learners they wanted to target with technology in the classroom. Before proceeding, she asked how we might formulate teaching tasks based on the many different types of learners we might encounter.

Students, Lubkin Chávez explained, need a link between the previous content they have learned and their current experiences in the world; for many, technology-enhanced learning can be what brings these two fields together. She went on to introduce a variety of tools educators can use in the classroom, including the active learning platform Echo360, and the workshop quickly transitioned into a structured Q&A between participants, Lubkin Chávez, and Brian Boston, Academic Technology and Internet Development Coordinator at CNDLS. Thinking critically of our own classes, we considered the many different ways technology could fit and enhance our individualized instruction.

The remainder of the time was spent as a very helpful workshop, in which participants learned, experimented with, and questioned the different forms of technology available to Georgetown faculty and staff members.