Brainstorming a Model for a Digital Humanities Network at Georgetown

Adam Rothman (History) led a discussion with faculty from various humanities departments and Lauinger staff about creating a network for collaborating on digital humanities projects on the final day of TLISI. Adam gave examples from his own class, including a digitized journal of a Jesuit priest during the Mexican War of 1848, and this visualization by CS major Matthew Burdumy showing the volume and density of the slave trade on a Google map (a site that has been viewed 10,000 times). Digital projects, he says, enhance student learning in his class by engaging his students with the artifacts and showing how they are used in creating history. Furthermore, he puts forth, humanities can be used to shed light on the digital age. Faculty agreed that these projects require a great deal of time, effort, and collaboration from various departments, and a network would facilitate the production and dissemination process. Faculty brainstormed onsite and virtual resources for faculty and students to learn about coding, and what a repository for created projects might look like. Both faculty and students who may not necessarily come from CS backgrounds would benefit from learning digital forms of research. These methods are not merely digital for the sake of it, but are similar to research methods that have been used for thousands of years. How will a digital humanities network look at Georgetown? The future is in the works! CNDLS wishes to thank Adam Rothman for facilitating this important conversation at TLISI this year.  

Adam Rothman (History) led a discussion with faculty from various humanities departments and Lauinger staff about creating a network for collaborating on digital humanities projects on the final day of TLISI. Adam gave examples from his own class, including a digitized journal of a Jesuit priest during the Mexican War of 1848, and this visualization by CS major Matthew Burdumy showing the volume and density of the slave trade on a Google map (a site that has been viewed 10,000 times). Digital projects, he says, enhance student learning in his class by engaging his students with the artifacts and showing how they are used in creating history. Furthermore, he puts forth, humanities can be used to shed light on the digital age.

Faculty agreed that these projects require a great deal of time, effort, and collaboration from various departments, and a network would facilitate the production and dissemination process. Faculty brainstormed onsite and virtual resources for faculty and students to learn about coding, and what a repository for created projects might look like.

Both faculty and students who may not necessarily come from CS backgrounds would benefit from learning digital forms of research. These methods are not merely digital for the sake of it, but are similar to research methods that have been used for thousands of years.

How will a digital humanities network look at Georgetown? The future is in the works!

CNDLS wishes to thank Adam Rothman for facilitating this important conversation at TLISI this year.