Bias and Intersectionality of Student Identities in the Classroom

Daviree Velázquez facilitated a second session in the Social Room Wednesday on self-awareness and implicit bias in the higher ed context, leading off with establishing "conditions for success" for the discussion among attendees of the workshop—a tie-in to a practice learned earlier in the day during the Facilitating Difficult Discussions workshop. These conditions emerged from suggestions from the attendees and were posted throughout the discussion on a poster at the back of the room. They included such considerations as tolerance, honesty, and listening.

There followed a team-building activity to encourage sharing of personal identities among attendees, which, though challenging, was also rewarding as a means to encourage trust and experiential sharing among participants. Next, Velázquez helped participants to navigate the differences between their personal and their social identities, with worksheets to be completed and discussed in small groups at tables. Attendees were guided through a conceptual framework of the cycle of socialization, which traces socialization to social identificational categories throughout development from birth into adulthood.
After introducing this conceptual framework, Velázquez led the participants in a consideration of power, privilege, and oppression, which finally allowed the attendees to define implicit bias and how it can manifest in the classroom and broader university contexts. This consideration over the course of the workshop allowed participants a renewed understanding of such terms as "stereotype," "prejudice," and "discrimination."

Daviree Velázquez facilitated a second session in the Social Room Wednesday on self-awareness and implicit bias in the higher ed context, leading off with establishing “conditions for success” for the discussion among attendees of the workshop—a tie-in to a practice learned earlier in the day during the Facilitating Difficult Discussions workshop. These conditions emerged from suggestions from the attendees and were posted throughout the discussion on a poster at the back of the room. They included such considerations as tolerance, honesty, and listening.

There followed a team-building activity to encourage sharing of personal identities among attendees, which, though challenging, was also rewarding as a means to encourage trust and experiential sharing among participants. Next, Velázquez helped participants to navigate the differences between their personal and their social identities, with worksheets to be completed and discussed in small groups at tables. Attendees were guided through a conceptual framework of the cycle of socialization, which traces socialization to social identificational categories throughout development from birth into adulthood.

After introducing this conceptual framework, Velázquez led the participants in a consideration of power, privilege, and oppression, which finally allowed the attendees to define implicit bias and how it can manifest in the classroom and broader university contexts. This consideration over the course of the workshop allowed participants a renewed understanding of such terms as “stereotype,” “prejudice,” and “discrimination.”