Artifacts, Talks, and Chocolate—Oh My!

The social hour on the third day of TLISI 2016 served as a capstone to the past three years of the Initiative for Technology-Enhanced Learning (ITEL) and combined a series of lightning talks from ITEL awardees and hands-on exhibits of faculty projects with a chocolate fountain, creating a fun and celebratory environment for the nearly 100 attendees.

In order to make the wonderful work of ITEL awardees tangible, the showcase featured "artifacts" from 22 different projects, ranging from custom-developed platforms and tools, interactive games, and multimedia presentations. Some of the artifacts on display included the MyDante platform for reading and annotating the Divine Comedy, a custom application built by the CNDLS team in collaboration with Frank Ambrosio (Philosophy); a game for second-language Spanish instruction being used by Ron Leow (Spanish & Portuguese); and a demo of the software "Splunk" which Betsy Sigman (Business) used to give her students hands-on experience in data analysis. Attendees interacted with the artifacts while enjoying refreshments, hors d'oeuvres, and chocolate-covered treats.
The event also featured a series of brief PechaKucha-inspired talks by faculty addressing how ITEL had impacted their teaching. Ben Harbert (Music) shared how his music annotation software helps students from a wide range of backgrounds listen to and analyze music in new ways. Stacey Kaltman (Medicine) shared the impact of realistic patient simulations on students' preparation for medical practice. Overall, the speakers showed the breadth of this Initiative’s impact on teaching and learning across the university.
Check out a few of the digital artifacts from the ITEL Showcase below! Artifact: POGU, a webpage featuring articles written collaboratively by students at Georgetown and Sciences Po Lyon. This artifact comes from "Extending the Use of Teletandem in Language Courses Department," led by Alissa Webel (French). Project Description: Webel's project is part of an extended ITEL project through which six Foreign Language Learning departments are using teletandem to connect Georgetown students with peers at universities in Brazil, Mexico, France, Italy, Turkey, Russia, Jordan, and Japan. For her French for Politics course, Webel worked with a professor of American politics at Sciences Po Lyon to explore a different type of teletandem course that goes beyond speaking: students in Webel's class were instructed to write a 2,000-word article in the target language, which was edited and advised by the French students. At the end of the semester, the students publish their articles on POGU.
Artifact: Virtual Build Steam Still, an interactive lab module implemented on a touchscreen for use by organic chemistry students as part of the open track "Making the most of Laboratory Time Department" project by Ron Davis (Chemistry). Project Description: This project extends work begun as part of the Round 4 games cohort to develop a self-paced, interactive lab preparation exercise for an introductory Chemistry course using affordable, accessible software and computing tools. The aim was to increase student confidence and efficiency during lab time, resulting in few broken glass tubes, fewer student tears, and additional lab time for instruction in other aspects of the practice of science.
Artifact: The Medieval Reader platform, under development by Emily Francomano (Spanish & Portuguese) and team for "The Medieval Reader: A Platform for Digitally Enhanced Reading in Manuscript Culture." Project Description: Through this project, a digital edition of Libro de buen amor [The book of good love] was created to develop a platform for undergraduates to immerse themselves in the multidimensionality of manuscript culture in the Middle Ages.

The social hour on the third day of TLISI 2016 served as a capstone to the past three years of the Initiative for Technology-Enhanced Learning (ITEL) and combined a series of lightning talks from ITEL awardees and hands-on exhibits of faculty projects with a chocolate fountain, creating a fun and celebratory environment for the nearly 100 attendees.

In order to make the wonderful work of ITEL awardees tangible, the showcase featured “artifacts” from 22 different projects, ranging from custom-developed platforms and tools, interactive games, and multimedia presentations. Some of the artifacts on display included the MyDante platform for reading and annotating the Divine Comedy, a custom application built by the CNDLS team in collaboration with Frank Ambrosio (Philosophy); a game for second-language Spanish instruction being used by Ron Leow (Spanish & Portuguese); and a demo of the software “Splunk” which Betsy Sigman (Business) used to give her students hands-on experience in data analysis. Attendees interacted with the artifacts while enjoying refreshments, hors d’oeuvres, and chocolate-covered treats.

The event also featured a series of brief PechaKucha-inspired talks by faculty addressing how ITEL had impacted their teaching. Ben Harbert (Music) shared how his music annotation software helps students from a wide range of backgrounds listen to and analyze music in new ways. Stacey Kaltman (Medicine) shared the impact of realistic patient simulations on students’ preparation for medical practice. Overall, the speakers showed the breadth of this Initiative’s impact on teaching and learning across the university.

Check out a few of the digital artifacts from the ITEL Showcase below!

Artifact: POGU, a webpage featuring articles written collaboratively by students at Georgetown and Sciences Po Lyon. This artifact comes from “Extending the Use of Teletandem in Language Courses Department,” led by Alissa Webel (French).

Project Description: Webel’s project is part of an extended ITEL project through which six Foreign Language Learning departments are using teletandem to connect Georgetown students with peers at universities in Brazil, Mexico, France, Italy, Turkey, Russia, Jordan, and Japan. For her French for Politics course, Webel worked with a professor of American politics at Sciences Po Lyon to explore a different type of teletandem course that goes beyond speaking: students in Webel’s class were instructed to write a 2,000-word article in the target language, which was edited and advised by the French students. At the end of the semester, the students publish their articles on POGU.


Artifact: Virtual Build Steam Still, an interactive lab module implemented on a touchscreen for use by organic chemistry students as part of the open track “Making the most of Laboratory Time Department” project by Ron Davis (Chemistry).

Project Description: This project extends work begun as part of the Round 4 games cohort to develop a self-paced, interactive lab preparation exercise for an introductory Chemistry course using affordable, accessible software and computing tools. The aim was to increase student confidence and efficiency during lab time, resulting in few broken glass tubes, fewer student tears, and additional lab time for instruction in other aspects of the practice of science.


Artifact: The Medieval Reader platform, under development by Emily Francomano (Spanish & Portuguese) and team for “The Medieval Reader: A Platform for Digitally Enhanced Reading in Manuscript Culture.”

Project Description: Through this project, a digital edition of Libro de buen amor [The book of good love] was created to develop a platform for undergraduates to immerse themselves in the multidimensionality of manuscript culture in the Middle Ages.