Altering Syllabi for Transparency Around Participation

The first Tuesday IPC sessions, Syllabus Design for Engaging Diversity, was led by Michelle Ohnona from the Office of the Provost and David Ebenbach, Postdoctoral Researcher at CNDLS. Many attendees of the session were particularly interested in whatever information they would be able to obtain surrounding the new Engaging Diversity core requirement slated to come into effect in the fall for all newly matriculating first-year Georgetown undergraduate students. Despite the potential for this to have veered into some rote territory where the diversity requirement and its implementation would simply have been outlined for attending faculty, Ohnona expertly brought in the critical perspective around diversity initiatives suitable to an audience of academics, while also describing her role as an administrator helping to bring about this change.

Both Ohnona and Ebenbach shared personal tips from their syllabi from previous courses, while also encouraging faculty to pose any outstanding questions about the new core curriculum. This being a workshop, the faculty were then encouraged to use Ohnona and Ebenbach's policies, expectations, and ground rules sections of their respective syllabi to draft some of their own, and to share out in small groups at their tables. The attendees especially latched onto language around participation and strategies for participation. Some faculty who had never incorporated a section on expectations of participation into their course syllabi previously came away from the session with a plan to do so for upcoming courses.

The first Tuesday IPC sessions, Syllabus Design for Engaging Diversity, was led by Michelle Ohnona from the Office of the Provost and David Ebenbach, Postdoctoral Researcher at CNDLS. Many attendees of the session were particularly interested in whatever information they would be able to obtain surrounding the new Engaging Diversity core requirement slated to come into effect in the fall for all newly matriculating first-year Georgetown undergraduate students. Despite the potential for this to have veered into some rote territory where the diversity requirement and its implementation would simply have been outlined for attending faculty, Ohnona expertly brought in the critical perspective around diversity initiatives suitable to an audience of academics, while also describing her role as an administrator helping to bring about this change.

Both Ohnona and Ebenbach shared personal tips from their syllabi from previous courses, while also encouraging faculty to pose any outstanding questions about the new core curriculum. This being a workshop, the faculty were then encouraged to use Ohnona and Ebenbach’s policies, expectations, and ground rules sections of their respective syllabi to draft some of their own, and to share out in small groups at their tables. The attendees especially latched onto language around participation and strategies for participation. Some faculty who had never incorporated a section on expectations of participation into their course syllabi previously came away from the session with a plan to do so for upcoming courses.