Shared Work: How Student Well-Being Can Bring Faculty and Staff Together

In an opinion piece published on Inside Higher Ed this week, CNDLS' David Ebenbach argues that academic institutions depend on the efforts of many people doing many kinds of work; faculty and staff, for starters, are both essential to our students' success. And yet at many colleges and universities there are few opportunities for faculty and staff to work together, despite the fact that we share an obvious point of connection: our students. Luckily, here at Georgetown, we have the Engelhard Project, which aims to infuse issues of student well-being throughout the curriculum. In this project, faculty bring topics of well-being into their courses, and staff from across campus—from CAPS, from the Academic Resource Center, from Health Education Services, and many more departments and centers at Georgetown—come to class to share their expertise on the topic.

Great things happen in Engelhard courses: students make connections between what they're learning and their lives beyond the classroom, and faculty and staff make connections to one another. As they work together again and again and gather for informal Engelhard group conversations outside the classroom, these faculty-staff relationships deepen. Now about to enter its 13th year of existence, the Engelhard Project continues to reinforce the importance—and the responsibility—of a shared approach to our students' learning and well-being. Read the entire article here to learn more.

In an opinion piece published on Inside Higher Ed this week, CNDLS’ David Ebenbach argues that academic institutions depend on the efforts of many people doing many kinds of work; faculty and staff, for starters, are both essential to our students’ success. And yet at many colleges and universities there are few opportunities for faculty and staff to work together, despite the fact that we share an obvious point of connection: our students.

Luckily, here at Georgetown, we have the Engelhard Project, which aims to infuse issues of student well-being throughout the curriculum. In this project, faculty bring topics of well-being into their courses, and staff from across campus—from CAPS, from the Academic Resource Center, from Health Education Services, and many more departments and centers at Georgetown—come to class to share their expertise on the topic.

Great things happen in Engelhard courses: students make connections between what they’re learning and their lives beyond the classroom, and faculty and staff make connections to one another. As they work together again and again and gather for informal Engelhard group conversations outside the classroom, these faculty-staff relationships deepen.

Now about to enter its 13th year of existence, the Engelhard Project continues to reinforce the importance—and the responsibility—of a shared approach to our students’ learning and well-being. Read the entire article here to learn more.