ITEL Grants Announced for Second Funding Cycle

We are delighted to announce funding decisions for the second ITEL call, which include 3 faculty cohorts, 4 Open Track projects, and a slate of fall 2014 GeorgetownX courses. These new grants join our ongoing work with the 27 faculty projects funded during the first ITEL call for proposals. This round, we made the effort to increase the number of faculty with whom we could work directly by inviting faculty to apply to one of three cohorts exploring themes around technology-enhanced learning. We also solicited applications for Open Track projects, which we see as providing the space for faculty to experiment with technology and pedagogical design in a focused, intensive way. Together with the fall 2014 GeorgetownX courses, we hope that this call's range of opportunities for engagement with the themes of ITEL will advance us toward ITEL's goal of effecting transformational change across campus. Over 30 cohort awardees, who will each join a cohort exploring one of three themes, comprise a diverse body of faculty from a variety of departments and schools across the university.  This year, there are three cohorts within the cohort track, and each is tied to a theme: 1) deepening classroom engagement with tablet or mobile computing; 2) using open educational resources (OERs); and 3) exploring the use of technologies to educate the whole person.

Tablet or Mobile Technology Cohort
Ben Harbert
Alex Montero
Rusty Phillips
Eileen Moore
Jon Hartmann
Michael Osborne
Carlos Suarez-Quian
Aykut Uren
Aaron Hanlon
Garrison LeMasters
Genevieve Lester
 
 
 
Open Educational Resources (OERs) Cohort
Veronica Donahue
Mark Rom
Lamar Reinsch
Anne Rosenwald
Timothy Jorgenson
Jennifer Swift
Jan Blancato
Monica Arruda De Almeida
Rollie Flynn
Shareen Joshi
 
  
Technology to Educate the Whole Person Cohort
Dana Luciano
Jason Tilan
Lahra Smith
JR (Wayne) Osborn
Betsi Stephen
Anna Trester
Rachel Brady
Yulia Chentsova-Dutton
Robert Patterson
 
 
 
  
While cohort members will pursue their own pedagogical goals as they experiment with these technologies in small but meaningful ways in their spring 2014 courses, each cohort will collectively help establish models and examples of effective practices for teaching with technology that can be shared with the larger Georgetown community. This “small but meaningful” strategy has generated very promising project ideas. A few examples follow.

Aaron Hanlon of the English Department will use tablets in his survey course on Satire to address the problem of isolated close-reading in his classroom. His students will use tablets in conjunction with an online text-annotation platform to create real-time text annotations with supplemental photos and videos.

Jennifer Swift, Associate Professor of Chemistry, will research and evaluate how Open Educational Resources (OERs) can enhance her Molecular Gastronomy course. Students in previous iterations of the class have asked for a lab component, and Jennifer hopes to incorporating pre-existing resources—including, potentially, a HarvardX course on Science & Cooking—into her class in order to increase the cooking demonstrations students witness and are able to draw upon as they apply theoretical chemical concepts to practical matters.

Jason Tilan, professor in Human Science program, teaches a course on Physiological Adaptations that explores the relationship of stressful environments and our capacity for emotional adaptation. As a member of the Using Technology to Educate the Whole Person cohort, Jason will create assignments using readily available online tools with which his students will reflect on their own challenges in reaching socio-emotional equilibrium and establish a plan for learning and growing toward that goal.

CNDLS would like to congratulate Michael Ferreira, Martin Irvine, Donatella Melucci and Louise Hipwell, and Cynthia Schneider, recipients of the Open Track awards. The Open Track awards will experiment with technologies and pedagogical designs to improve teaching and student learning, either at the course or curricular level. These projects will also offer insights that are widely applicable, scalable, and transformational. These 4 Open Track projects join the 24 ongoing Level I, II, III, and pilot projects funded during the first round.

Michael Ferreira, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, will extend his use of Teletandem, which is currently employed in Portuguese courses, to other languages in the Faculty of Languages and Linguistics.  He aims to address empirically the benefits of learning via this medium and across languages when compared to the traditional classroom exposure in different language classes. Faculty participating in this expansion of Teletandem include Ron Leow (Spanish & Portuguese), Lioudmilla Federova (Slavic Languages), Sylvia Önder (Turkish), Alissa Webel (French), and Terrence Potter (Arabic).

Martin Irvine, Founding Director and Associate Professor in Communication, Culture & Technology, will develop a CCT course in “Major Concepts in Technology” to be offered through the Graduate School of Arts and Science as an online-only, three-credit graduate-level course to qualified students from other universities or to qualified working professionals interested in beginning a graduate degree program. Martin envisions his ITEL-funded course project as a pilot project that will result in the creation of a scalable and extensible model for for-credit online courses, which he regards as an urgently felt need as Georgetown seeks to develop ways to extend its mission and open new revenue growth opportunities in online education.

Donatella Melucci and Louise Hipwell of the Department of Italian will create a hybrid format for Intensive Italian Advanced for fall 2014. Professor Melucci’s project idea arose from research about curricula that feature technology enhancements; such curricula offer students increased exposure to the target language and provide more opportunities to practice it. In order to harness those benefits, the Donatella and Louise will move an intensive advanced Italian course into a hybrid format that features both online and face-to-face instruction.

Cynthia Schneider will implement SOLIYA, a cross-cultural communication platform, in her Diplomacy and Culture class, enabling Georgetown University students to exchange perspectives on politics, religion, and culture with fellow students across the globe.

Finally, we are pleased to announce the lineup of GeorgetownX courses for the fall of 2014, with announcements of spring 2015 courses coming soon:

Frank Ambrosio will lead a GeorgetownX course on Dante that will include the integration of a rich reading environment, MyDante, to deepen students' interactions with literary texts.

Daniel Byman will lead a GeorgetownX course on Terrorism and Counterterrorism, exploring the dangers and varieties of terrorism and assessing the effectiveness of counterterrorist responses.

And we will re-launch Ted Moran's fall 2013 GeorgetownX course, Globalization's Winners and Losers, for a second iteration.

In all, over 50 faculty will participate in this round of ITEL projects and cohorts. We are excited by the opportunities afforded for sharing practices between ongoing ITEL work and these newly funded projects, and we look forward to the development and implementation of these innovative and imaginative proposals.

We are delighted to announce funding decisions for the second ITEL call, which include 3 faculty cohorts, 4 Open Track projects, and a slate of fall 2014 GeorgetownX courses. These new grants join our ongoing work with the 27 faculty projects funded during the first ITEL call for proposals.

This round, we made the effort to increase the number of faculty with whom we could work directly by inviting faculty to apply to one of three cohorts exploring themes around technology-enhanced learning. We also solicited applications for Open Track projects, which we see as providing the space for faculty to experiment with technology and pedagogical design in a focused, intensive way. Together with the fall 2014 GeorgetownX courses, we hope that this call’s range of opportunities for engagement with the themes of ITEL will advance us toward ITEL’s goal of effecting transformational change across campus.

Over 30 cohort awardees, who will each join a cohort exploring one of three themes, comprise a diverse body of faculty from a variety of departments and schools across the university.  This year, there are three cohorts within the cohort track, and each is tied to a theme: 1) deepening classroom engagement with tablet or mobile computing; 2) using open educational resources (OERs); and 3) exploring the use of technologies to educate the whole person.

Tablet or Mobile Technology Cohort
Ben Harbert
Alex Montero
Rusty Phillips
Eileen Moore
Jon Hartmann
Michael Osborne
Carlos Suarez-Quian
Aykut Uren
Aaron Hanlon
Garrison LeMasters
Genevieve Lester
 
 
 
Open Educational Resources (OERs) Cohort
Veronica Donahue
Mark Rom
Lamar Reinsch
Anne Rosenwald
Timothy Jorgenson
Jennifer Swift
Jan Blancato
Monica Arruda De Almeida
Rollie Flynn
Shareen Joshi
 
  
Technology to Educate the Whole Person Cohort
Dana Luciano
Jason Tilan
Lahra Smith
JR (Wayne) Osborn
Betsi Stephen
Anna Trester
Rachel Brady
Yulia Chentsova-Dutton
Robert Patterson
 
 
 
  

While cohort members will pursue their own pedagogical goals as they experiment with these technologies in small but meaningful ways in their spring 2014 courses, each cohort will collectively help establish models and examples of effective practices for teaching with technology that can be shared with the larger Georgetown community. This “small but meaningful” strategy has generated very promising project ideas. A few examples follow.

Aaron Hanlon of the English Department will use tablets in his survey course on Satire to address the problem of isolated close-reading in his classroom. His students will use tablets in conjunction with an online text-annotation platform to create real-time text annotations with supplemental photos and videos.

Jennifer Swift, Associate Professor of Chemistry, will research and evaluate how Open Educational Resources (OERs) can enhance her Molecular Gastronomy course. Students in previous iterations of the class have asked for a lab component, and Jennifer hopes to incorporating pre-existing resources—including, potentially, a HarvardX course on Science & Cooking—into her class in order to increase the cooking demonstrations students witness and are able to draw upon as they apply theoretical chemical concepts to practical matters.

Jason Tilan, professor in Human Science program, teaches a course on Physiological Adaptations that explores the relationship of stressful environments and our capacity for emotional adaptation. As a member of the Using Technology to Educate the Whole Person cohort, Jason will create assignments using readily available online tools with which his students will reflect on their own challenges in reaching socio-emotional equilibrium and establish a plan for learning and growing toward that goal.

CNDLS would like to congratulate Michael Ferreira, Martin Irvine, Donatella Melucci and Louise Hipwell, and Cynthia Schneider, recipients of the Open Track awards. The Open Track awards will experiment with technologies and pedagogical designs to improve teaching and student learning, either at the course or curricular level. These projects will also offer insights that are widely applicable, scalable, and transformational. These 4 Open Track projects join the 24 ongoing Level I, II, III, and pilot projects funded during the first round.

Michael Ferreira, Associate Professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Spanish and Portuguese, will extend his use of Teletandem, which is currently employed in Portuguese courses, to other languages in the Faculty of Languages and Linguistics.  He aims to address empirically the benefits of learning via this medium and across languages when compared to the traditional classroom exposure in different language classes. Faculty participating in this expansion of Teletandem include Ron Leow (Spanish & Portuguese), Lioudmilla Federova (Slavic Languages), Sylvia Önder (Turkish), Alissa Webel (French), and Terrence Potter (Arabic).

Martin Irvine, Founding Director and Associate Professor in Communication, Culture & Technology, will develop a CCT course in “Major Concepts in Technology” to be offered through the Graduate School of Arts and Science as an online-only, three-credit graduate-level course to qualified students from other universities or to qualified working professionals interested in beginning a graduate degree program. Martin envisions his ITEL-funded course project as a pilot project that will result in the creation of a scalable and extensible model for for-credit online courses, which he regards as an urgently felt need as Georgetown seeks to develop ways to extend its mission and open new revenue growth opportunities in online education.

Donatella Melucci and Louise Hipwell of the Department of Italian will create a hybrid format for Intensive Italian Advanced for fall 2014. Professor Melucci’s project idea arose from research about curricula that feature technology enhancements; such curricula offer students increased exposure to the target language and provide more opportunities to practice it. In order to harness those benefits, the Donatella and Louise will move an intensive advanced Italian course into a hybrid format that features both online and face-to-face instruction.

Cynthia Schneider will implement SOLIYA, a cross-cultural communication platform, in her Diplomacy and Culture class, enabling Georgetown University students to exchange perspectives on politics, religion, and culture with fellow students across the globe.

Finally, we are pleased to announce the lineup of GeorgetownX courses for the fall of 2014, with announcements of spring 2015 courses coming soon:

Frank Ambrosio will lead a GeorgetownX course on Dante that will include the integration of a rich reading environment, MyDante, to deepen students’ interactions with literary texts.

Daniel Byman will lead a GeorgetownX course on Terrorism and Counterterrorism, exploring the dangers and varieties of terrorism and assessing the effectiveness of counterterrorist responses.

And we will re-launch Ted Moran‘s fall 2013 GeorgetownX course, Globalization’s Winners and Losers, for a second iteration.

In all, over 50 faculty will participate in this round of ITEL projects and cohorts. We are excited by the opportunities afforded for sharing practices between ongoing ITEL work and these newly funded projects, and we look forward to the development and implementation of these innovative and imaginative proposals.