Making Connections with ePortfolios

Creating ePortfolios, which are digital collections of student work, helps students to articulate their academic goals, make connections across disparate courses and disciplines, and reflect back on work done throughout their academic careers. Students' ePortfolios can also function as electronic CVs, allowing students to showcase their work in a variety of media to prospective employers. At Georgetown, ePortfolios have proved useful in a wide variety of programs and departments.  For example, Natalie Khazaal's students film themselves speaking Arabic for their ePortfolios. As she explains it, "the ePortfolios speak volumes to employers. They are a huge advantage over the paper résumé."  Betsi Stephen's STIA students work on their ePortfolios over their entire Georgetown careers, which, as she says, "allows them to see the arc of their work and how it progresses over time.  They're able to make connections inside and outside the classroom, connecting their coursework to their study-abroad experiences, internships, and more."  Fellows in the Department of Family Medicine, with help from fellowship director Kim Bullock and department administrator Kathleen McNamara, use ePortfolios to draw connections among the clinical, teaching, and leadership components of their fellowships. To learn more, visit the Georgetown University Digital Commons "Get Ideas" page on ePortfolios, where you'll find examples, tips, tools, and resources.

Creating ePortfolios, which are digital collections of student work, helps students to articulate their academic goals, make connections across disparate courses and disciplines, and reflect back on work done throughout their academic careers.

Creating ePortfolios, which are digital collections of student work, helps students to articulate their academic goals, make connections across disparate courses and disciplines, and reflect back on work done throughout their academic careers. Students’ ePortfolios can also function as electronic CVs, allowing students to showcase their work in a variety of media to prospective employers.

At Georgetown, ePortfolios have proved useful in a wide variety of programs and departments.  For example, Natalie Khazaal’s students film themselves speaking Arabic for their ePortfolios. As she explains it, “the ePortfolios speak volumes to employers. They are a huge advantage over the paper résumé.”  Betsi Stephen’s STIA students work on their ePortfolios over their entire Georgetown careers, which, as she says, “allows them to see the arc of their work and how it progresses over time.  They’re able to make connections inside and outside the classroom, connecting their coursework to their study-abroad experiences, internships, and more.”  Fellows in the Department of Family Medicine, with help from fellowship director Kim Bullock and department administrator Kathleen McNamara, use ePortfolios to draw connections among the clinical, teaching, and leadership components of their fellowships.

To learn more, visit the Georgetown University Digital Commons “Get Ideas” page on ePortfolios, where you’ll find examples, tips, tools, and resources.