Update on Project Rebirth

Colleen Kearns, an undergraduate research assistant working on Project Rebirth, shares this update on a recent event at the Berkley Center. Faculty, alumni, and students gathered at Georgetown’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs on Monday, November 16 for a preview of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, which will be built where the Twin Towers once stood in Lower Manhattan. CNDLS, working with Columbia University’s Center for New Media Teaching and Learning, is developing the Project Rebirth Learning Collaboratory, an online social environment for studying documentary footage about 9/11. At the event, Caitlin Olson, the director of program partnerships and initiatives at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, shared information about the site’s design,  construction, and future exhibits.  Brian Rafferty (COL ’79), chairman of Project Rebirth, updated students and faculty on the progress of the Project Rebirth documentary film—also entitled Project Rebirth— which is scheduled to be released in 2010. He also showed a four-minute clip of the film, which is directed by Georgetown alumnus Jim Whitaker (COL ’90). CNDLS’ Randy Bass, who is in his third year of working with Project Rebirth, discussed how he’s been using the project in his first-year writing classes. He stressed the importance of building a robust, digital library to cultivate a powerful virtual learning environment for study of the Project Rebirth resources. Michael Kessler, a visiting assistant professor of Government and the assistant director of the Berkley Center, spoke about the collaboration between the Berkley Center and the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. The two institutions recently sponsored a faculty panel called “After September 11th: Change in the Academy?” that explored how 9/11 has affected various academic disciplines.

Faculty, alumni, and students gathered at Georgetown’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs on Monday, November 16 for a preview of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, which will be built where the Twin Towers once stood in Lower Manhattan.

Colleen Kearns, an undergraduate research assistant working on Project Rebirth, shares this update on a recent event at the Berkley Center.

Faculty, alumni, and students gathered at Georgetown’s Berkley Center for Religion, Peace, and World Affairs on Monday, November 16 for a preview of the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, which will be built where the Twin Towers once stood in Lower Manhattan. CNDLS, working with Columbia University’s Center for New Media Teaching and Learning, is developing the Project Rebirth Learning Collaboratory, an online social environment for studying documentary footage about 9/11.

At the event, Caitlin Olson, the director of program partnerships and initiatives at the National September 11 Memorial & Museum, shared information about the site’s design,  construction, and future exhibits.  Brian Rafferty (COL ’79), chairman of Project Rebirth, updated students and faculty on the progress of the Project Rebirth documentary film—also entitled Project Rebirth— which is scheduled to be released in 2010. He also showed a four-minute clip of the film, which is directed by Georgetown alumnus Jim Whitaker (COL ’90).

CNDLS’ Randy Bass, who is in his third year of working with Project Rebirth, discussed how he’s been using the project in his first-year writing classes. He stressed the importance of building a robust, digital library to cultivate a powerful virtual learning environment for study of the Project Rebirth resources. Michael Kessler, a visiting assistant professor of Government and the assistant director of the Berkley Center, spoke about the collaboration between the Berkley Center and the National September 11 Memorial & Museum. The two institutions recently sponsored a faculty panel called “After September 11th: Change in the Academy?” that explored how 9/11 has affected various academic disciplines.