Yoon Lee's Weblog

Bio: Raised in Seoul, Korea, I now live with my parents and sister in Fairfax, VA. I went to George Mason University for B.A. in Media Production major. During my senior year of college, I was interning at USA TODAY and WETA(Channel 26) as my first step of broadcasting career. After finished my undergraduate degree at GMU, I got a job at ABC7/News Channel 8 as a production assistant until I got into Georgetown University.

 

Posts

 

Jun 12 2009

Triadic Relationship Between China, North and South Korea

In my final project, I will take a look at a triadic relationship between China, North Korea and South Korea, and how each dyad relationship influences to the relationship with the third party.  I will use Simmel’s Triad Theory to measure the relationships of these three countries and how this theory fits in the reality.

 

According to the Simmelian Triad model, three actors who are connecting throughout a mutual friend tend to maintain stable relationships.  Within this triad relationship, if A and B, and A and C are connected to each other, the relationship between B and C tends to connect to each other with either a week tie or a strong tie.  For example, A is not a big fan of Obama and his friend B is.  Then, they can be friends without changing their minds.  However, both of their friends, C, is also a big fan of Obama, A tends to follow the way of his friends think on certain issues.

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Jun 09 2009

Jane Jacobs’ Idea of City and Doha

Even though cities are not creatures with life like human beings, the structures, shapes and functions have been changed in every moments and locations . The cities offering places where human beings make their lives consist of various and complex structures. They also determine the cities’ rise and fall. Such changes occurring in cities are the attempt to make new cultures and rules.

If so, why are some cities rising whereas others are falling? Jane Jacobs in her book, “Cities and the Wealth of Nations” metaphors cities as the creatures with life which is born, mature, rotten, and reborn. In her book, she criticizes the drab uniformity of the modernism in the space of cities, and its impersonality. She, rather, stresses the importance of diversity and history preservation in cities.

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Jun 08 2009

The World Becomes Flat

The World Becomes Flat

 

 

Network and International Development

Reflection Paper #8

Yoon Joung Lee

 

 

According to Thomas Freeman, many developing countries such as China, Russia, Mexico, Brazil, and India attempted a “reform wholesale” after Berlin wall was collapsed.  This reformation includes privatizing national companies, free of financial and commercial markets, encouraging direct investments of foreigners, and so on.

 

The results of such movements were prominently shown in China.  The population of 3.7 billion in 1990 with a daily income of $1 decreased to 2.1 billion in 1990.  During the same period of time, some North Asia including India, Pakistan and Bangladesh experienced the same thing happened with China.  On the other hand, the number of people in poverty in the countries in Africa who did not participate in globalization had been increased.

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Jun 04 2009

Importance of Education to Accumulate Social Capital

Importance of Education to Accumulate Social Capital

Reflection Paper #7

Network and International Development

Yoon Joung Lee

What would be the best asset in 20th century?  Putnam insists that the best assets in 20th century is neither coal oil nor Uranium, but the social capital including knowledge, trusts, cooperation, social norms.  If so, how much social capital do we possess?

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Jun 01 2009

A Development Strategist for Korea

A Development Strategist for Korea

Network and International Development

Reflection Paper #5

Yoon Joung Lee

If I were a development strategist in Korea, I would mainly concern three things: 1) research, 2) consulting, and 3) training.  In this global era, the distance between countries is getting shorter and shorter.  Every country is somehow connected to and influencing each other as the technology makes this even possible.  I, as a development strategist in Korea, would consider supporting developments of other developing countries as one of the strategies for Korea.

Firstly, I would focus on researching the economic developments of other developing countries based on the economic developments Korea has achieved in the past.  Specially, looking back at how the Korean economic developments have been changed will help finding the effective way to provide ODA supports for other developing countries that are facing a similar path or the countries changed their internal structures.  In addition, I would specifically encourage the economic cooperation between Korea and other developing countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, or Middle East.

Secondly, professional consulting targeting the public and civil organizations in developing countries will be mainly pursued, as well as the previous studies and analysis for the Korean government’s efficient supports.  Also, such consulting will be expected to build the broad networks and strong relationships between the local professionals and international professionals that will bring a major solution to achieve the successful outcomes in their overall developments as well as partial developments such as public finances, private managements or industrialism.

Lastly, I would focus on training the skills and abilities of government employees in developing countries by professional level of education.  The countries we can offer our educational helps are Paraguay, Azerbaijan, Tanzania, Senegal, Mongo, and Iraq. The training will cover the specific topics including economic development strategies, public administrations, trading, foreigners’ direct investments and so on.

These three factors – research, consulting, and training – are what I will specifically focus on as a strategist for the Korea’s future development. I strongly believe the world is all connected to each other. The time we took several days to trade our goods to, and waiting for several days to get a response message back from other countries no longer exists. Technologies made the networks connecting across the world possible and we are able to survive alone, but together. Therefore, helping out and providing supports to whom in similar situations with what Korea have experienced in the past are the vital elements to save the developing countries, and their successes and achievements will also positively impact on Korea’s economic development.

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May 28 2009

The Relationship between North Korea and China

What’s the Impact of the Relationship

Between North Korea and China on the World Networks?

Network and International Development

Reflection Paper #4

Yoon Joung Lee

Answering this question might be the part of my final paper which attempts to find the impact of North Korea in a global level and how the networks function in a relationship between North Korea and the rest of the world.  However, in today’s project, I would focus specifically on the special relationship between North Korea and China and how their relationships impact on the world networks.

There is no relationship in the world history as complicated as the relationship between China and North Korea.  During the Cold War when the U.S. and the Soviet Union were confronted each other as two huge oppositions, socialism countries tended to accept every official opinions other socialism countries made and did not publicly open or study others’ histories or regimes to protect others as they treated each other as family countries.  The relationship between China and the North Korea was not the exception.  Before  the post-Cold war, studying others between these two countries was absolutely prohibited in terms of keeping their blood alliances in the regime of socialism.  Even though there were several relationships being peeled the veils after the post-Cold war, there are still many questions left in the relationship between China and North Korea.

The relationship started when the North Korea government established the People’s Republic of Korea in 1948.  However, collapsing the beginning stage of the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe in 1990 significantly influenced the entire structure of international communism and caused fatal results in their future movements.  Such impact reached out to the Northeast Asia as well.  Under given situations, North Korea had a chance to have a turning point while they kept an amity with China who placed in one of the powerful socialism countries during the post-Cold War in 1992.

Korea’s friendly-relationships with the Soviet Union and China also contributed to break the balance of the structure formed based on two big oppositions; the United States and the Old Soviet Union.  The Northeast Asia moved toward the time of a new structural change as the U.S. – North Korea Negotiations and Japan-North Korea summit conferences kept holding upon the issue of nuclear.  China now tries to find out the answer about how to embrace North Korea and its current condition as it is.  It’s an attentional issue of the world how China and North Korea correlate to each other, because China is the existing socialism country who can give the most powerful impact on North Korea, and their relationship has a important key to forecast the future path of the international structure of Northeast Asia including North Korea itself who is facing a risk nowadays.

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May 26 2009

Nodes and Links in Networks_Reflection Paper #3

There are many things we cannot live without and we also cannot leave the connection with, while we live through our lives. Therefore, we, in many times, don’t recognize the importance of the entities of such things surrounding us. As we cannot live without water and air, the existence of human relationships is impossible without nodes and links.

In “Nexus”, what Buchanan focuses specially on is a “simplicity” of the networks. According to him, these complicated networks connecting the worlds can simply be explained with several mathematical formulas. The world, from his point of view, is a small network society where people can get in touch with each other after passing only a few bridges. His frequent expressions of “small,” “narrow” or “simple” in this book proves his idea of seeing our world as a small world. However, can we use this theory to explain the entire patterns of world networks?

I guess it is very dangerous to generalize the certain pattern as a whole. According to Barabaci in “Linked -The New Science of Networks,” he suggests the concept of “Scale-free Network” that every node has similar numbers of links, and it is possible to connect to each other if one node has at least one link. Also, when the number of links is increased, the distance between the nodes is decreased.

The number of links connecting the real world, however, very varies by nodes. For example, there are some people in human societies maintaining wider and broader networks than others. With the same idea, there are certain websites people click more than others as well. The most popular search engine “Google” is a great example of this. Google becomes the top search engine across the world even though it came after many others like AtaVista or Inktomi. Barabaci called such phenomenon of nodes’ preferring certain nodes as a “Preferential Attachment.”

States, financial institutes, and NGOs, as the nodes which are the center of each network, are also connecting to and impacting one another even though where their nodes are located in is different. In addition, the links spreading out from the nodes can be overlapped, crossed, or sometimes linearly moved forward with the links from other nodes. Such links are playing an important role as the brides to connect to other nodes. Therefore, these architectures are influencing and influenced by each other, and their relationships can not be existed alone.

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May 20 2009

Reflection Paper #2

I build my intellectual networks mostly within the church or school where I spend most of my time.  While there are many valuable impacts on the information exchange among classmates in CCT, the groups outside of the campus setting also introduce different and unique viewpoints that I could not think of during networking with CCTers. 

People with different backgrounds, religion, culture, gender, or the level of education look at the same topics in different ways.  Some interpret the situation from a problem-solver’s point of view, some see the same situation as a moderator, and others see the situation from the viewpoint of a bypasser.  Therefore, the lenses used to look at the same issue vary and their levels of bias or preoccupation on certain issues are different as well.  Such processing of information exchange with the interlocutors from different backgrounds is meaningful because it gives a chance to see the new aspect of the issue that one might not think of.  I try to get ideas on certain issues from as many people I know, combine the opinions, and make my final decision.

In relation to the issue of a network, drawing upon what we know about networksthe policies of Washington Consensus can be explained with the Domino theory according to which that the change of a certain location or region rapidly influences all the others, just as in the case of a viral effect works.  Under a big umbrella, every local economy is influenced by and connected to each other, and they eventually make one big global economy movement.  

During the 80’s, when many developing countries like Mexico could not pay back their tremendous debts to the West, the Western countries started to engage in changing the developing countries’ economic structures. The IMF intervened in the countries with a Monetary Approach where the World Bank came in with Structural Adjustment Program (SAP).   In the 90s, when communism in Eastern Europe disappeared, the Western politicians, economists, and scholars again attempted to intervene in these countries to change the entire structure in economy.   To me such efforts of the Western countries toward the second or third world countries is comes from an anxiety of the power of  a potential  domino effect that their networks might bring.

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