Tony Mazurkiewicz Named Chaplain for Athletics

Athletics graphic with headshot of TonyWhen Georgetown University’s nearly 600 student-athletes return in the fall, there will be one more staff member in the building to provide help and guidance as they navigate the intricate balance of life as a student-athlete. The Office of Mission and Ministry has announced the creation of a new role Chaplain for Athletics which will be filled by University employee Tony Mazurkiewicz.

Vice President for Mission and Ministry Rev. Mark Bosco, S.J., Ph.D. worked closely with Athletics to put together a position that would fill a gap within the student-athlete experience. The new position will provide pastoral care and spiritual accompaniment to student-athletes and teams. Mazurkiewicz will help support the administrators and coaching staff to develop ways to respond to the spiritual needs of students through pastoral presence, retreats and meditation practice.

The Department of Athletics has a rich tradition with the Jesuits on campus as well as numerous other chaplains associated with the University. While many teams have developed informal relationships with the spiritual leaders, sometimes spanning years, this position will set up a clear link between Athletics and the Office of Mission and Ministry.

“We’re excited to be partnering with the Office of Mission and Ministry to better serve our student-athletes,” said Director of Intercollegiate Athletics Lee Reed. “With added mental health support, the Cooper Athletics Leadership Program and now the chaplain position, we hope these resources will make an impact in the daily lives of our student-athletes. The commitment to cura personalis is never stronger when these relationships come together to truly live out our mission.”

Mazurkiewicz comes to Athletics from his current role as Director of Georgetown’s John Main Center for Meditation and Inter-Religious Dialogue. He currently serves as a Residential Minister for McCarthy Hall and has worked with the Georgetown football team.  Prior to his time at Georgetown, Mazurkiewicz was the President of Mount Carmel High School on the south side of Chicago for five years where he led 85 faculty and staff, over 700 students and their families as well as a network of more than 16,000 alumni.

He has over 20 years of ministerial and leadership experience in academic institutions, hospitals, jails, retreat centers, churches and social agencies. Mazurkiewicz received an undergraduate degree in History from Yale University in 1996, while also serving as the captain of the 1995 varsity football team. He received a Master of Divinity degree from the Washington Theological Union in 2009, and a certificate in Nonprofit Management from Northwestern University in 2016.

“I am excited and humbled to serve the Georgetown Athletics Department in this capacity,” said Mazurkiewicz. “I look forward to the opportunity to provide pastoral care and spiritual accompaniment to the student-athletes, coaches, staff and administration while also continuing to strengthen the partnership with the Office of Mission and Ministry. I am incredibly grateful to the Calcagnini family for their incredible generosity and support.”

The creation of the Athletics Chaplaincy was made possible through the generous support of Georgetown benefactors Nancy and the late Arthur (C’54) Calcagnini. Through their visionary leadership, and continued support for the whole of the Georgetown student body, the Calcagninis have provided the opportunity to fill a gap in our ministerial outreach.

“I am extremely excited to officially welcome Tony into the Hoya Athletics family,” said Georgetown Head Football Coach Rob Sgarlata. “Our student-athletes and staff have worked with Tony over the past two seasons. He has served as a tremendous resource for our program with regard to our overall wellness and team chemistry. I am looking forward to having him continue this work as he assumes his new role.”

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Student employee spotlight: Paige Harouse

Paige Harouse with Janine Karo (right)

Paige Harouse, COL’19 (left) with Janine Karo, COL’ 19, also a Campus Ministry student employee

As the Class of 2019 prepares to graduate this week, Campus Ministry would like to acknowledge the hard work of our student employees and their contributions to the mission of our department.

Dustin Hartuv (COL’21), Campus Ministry staff writer, reached out to our 16 student employee graduands to ask them about their time with the department. He brings us this Q & A with Paige Harouse, (COL’19), the final in a short series of reflections.

DH: How long have you worked for Campus Ministry?

PH: I’ve worked for Campus Ministry since week two or three of freshman year. I originally applied because I: a) needed to find a job, and b) had worked as a proctor in my high school’s interfaith building. I’m pretty sure that I was hired because I knew what Shabbat was.

DH: What is your job at Campus Ministry?

PH: I think my title in GMS is “interreligious events assistant,” or something like that. My role has changed a decent amount over the years as I’ve progressed in my coursework and interests and as Campus Ministry has grown. Much of the work I did involved working weekly services (and holidays) for Jewish Life and Muslim Life, helping manage social media and email newsletters, as well as behind the scenes prep and things. I also got the chance to help launch the Women in Faith Retreat (and student group) with student workers in my sophomore year.  We wanted to create a space for women (who have all sorts of relationships with religion) to talk about their religious identities, successes, and struggles in an interfaith context. It’s interesting when people ask me what I did because most people don’t realize that Georgetown has a robust campus ministry outside of Catholic life and that interfaith work is such a focus at the university.

DH: Do you have any “behind-the-scenes” anecdotes or funny stories you would like to share from working with Campus Ministry?

PH: One of my first tasks was to work Rosh HaShanah (the Jewish New year), except I only had other student workers (most of whom were also recent hires) as backups because my then-boss was out of town for a family function. Before she left, she joked that if we stayed, then her hiring choices were correct— they were.

I’ve seen (and done) a lot in four years. At one point I had to carry a Torah scroll across campus because the “Torah doctor” (the Hebrew term is sofer) was coming to inspect the scroll. Here I am walking across campus with a sacred object over 100+ years old that survived the Shoah (Holocaust), and I’m not sure that it’s going to survive the walk through the weekly farmer’s market.  

Other cool things I’ve done: help start the Jewish Life Instagram account; develop meaningful relationships with many of our chaplains (shout-out to Brahmachari-ji, Rabbi Ben, and Rabbi Rachel) and staff (shout-out to Morgan and Diana); worked a bar mitzvah in the ICC auditorium; found friendships with many co-workers; created the Women in Faith retreat; was paid to see a former president of Kosovo speak; celebrated a lot of holidays; learned how to get a catering cart from point A to point B the most efficient way possible; learned how much work it takes to support a religious community; ate a ton of free food; and learned how to coax Agatha (the main printer in G-01) into working.

DH: Has working at Campus Ministry deepened your knowledge of your own faith or other faith traditions?

PH: Yes to both! It’s given me an understanding of what it means for so many to “live their traditions” beyond the academic definition. It’s supplemented my coursework in Theology and Religious Studies, as well as my time spent abroad in Amman and Jerusalem. Looking inwards, I’ve been able to begin not only to ask the larger questions but learned to take responsibility for my own identity and how to support not only the communities that I want to be a part of but the communities that I want to build and grow.

DH: Has working in a multi-faith context prepared you for your future professional career?

PH: Working in a multi-faith context has enabled my future professional career. I’m moving to Berlin, Germany in September for a one-year fellowship with Action Reconciliation Service for Peace. There, I’ll be doing work relating to Holocaust memory, reconciliation, and education. I’ll primarily be working at the memorial service at the former concentration camp Sachsenhausen, but I’ll also be working with elderly members of the Berlin Jewish community.

I know that I’ll use the many skills learned— particularly the people skills, dialogue skills, and interfaith knowledge— during my year there. We’ll see what comes after, but I’m pretty busy in the meantime. I’m going to coach ultimate frisbee this summer with Ultimate Peace, a Middle East-based NGO that uses Ultimate to bring Jewish-Israeli, Arab-Israeli, and Palestinian youth together. I’m super excited about that! Afterwards, I’ll be working on staff for the fifth year at the German-language immersion camp that I attended growing up. I help organize and manage a lot of our historical, political, and cross-cultural programming and am super excited for all the fun activities already planned for this summer.

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Student employee spotlight: Evan Waddill

Evan Waddill

Evan Waddill

As the Class of 2019 prepares to graduate this week, Campus Ministry would like to acknowledge the hard work of our student employees and their contributions to the mission of our department.

Dustin Hartuv (COL’21), Campus Ministry staff writer, reached out to our 16 student employee graduands to ask them about their time with the department and brings us this Q & A with Evan Waddill, (SFS’19), the third in a short series of reflections.

DH: How long have you worked for Campus Ministry?

EW: Since my freshman year; I started right at the beginning of the school year and worked all the way through to my senior spring.

DH: What was your job at Campus Ministry?

EW: Hospitality team member and office assistant.

DH: Do you have any “behind-the-scenes” anecdotes or funny stories you would like to share from working with Campus Ministry?

EW: The one thing I’ve loved most about working at Campus Ministry is getting to know the chaplains and other staff members as “real people” and not just formal figures on campus. I think other students see them in their official capacity and forget that the individuals beneath the religious regalia are approachable and relatable in the best ways. I have formed personal relationships with many different members of the Campus Ministry community, finding common talking ground on everything from fiction to feminism. I was a very shy freshman when I started working, but thanks to the welcoming environment (and special encouragement from my first boss and mentor, Tiffany Lightfoot), I found a home on campus in Healy 113.

DH: Has working at Campus Ministry deepened your knowledge of your own faith or other faith traditions?

EW: I have definitely learned so much more about different faith traditions. Being a student worker in the front reception office, I am right near all the chaplains’ offices in Healy Hall. So, I have gotten to know many of them personally and heard first-hand about aspects of their religions. I grew up in a mostly Christian area, but I have loved getting to know about a wide variety of faith traditions here at Georgetown. I have especially enjoyed getting to be a part of some of their events through the work I do with the hospitality team, seeing for myself the beauty of a Diwali or Rosh Hashanah service, for example.

DH: Has working in a multi-faith context prepared you for your future professional career?

EW: Certainly it has, in a variety of ways that are not necessarily directly applicable but are nevertheless very important. I think learning in a multi-faith context translates to work in many types of fields/office spaces with diverse staff from different backgrounds. Learning about different faiths, their traditions, and the unique perspectives that belong to each member of that shared group has shown me how three-dimensional any identity is, much more than the stereotypical assumptions people might make about them. So, I think my work in any career would benefit from that knowledge and from the ability to respect such differences that ultimately do not matter when the people themselves are so worth knowing.

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Student employee spotlight: Anna Gloor

Anna Gloor

Anna Gloor

As the Class of 2019 prepares to graduate this week, Campus Ministry would like to acknowledge the hard work of our student employees and their contributions to the mission of our department.

Dustin Hartuv (COL’21), Campus Ministry staff writer, reached out to our 16 student employee graduands to ask them about their time with the department. He brings us this Q & A with Anna Gloor, (COL’19), the second in a short series of reflections.

DH: How long have you worked for Campus Ministry?

AG: I’ve worked for Campus Ministry for the past academic year, throughout the duration of my senior year here at Georgetown.

DH: What was your job at Campus Ministry?

AG: I worked for ESCAPE, the first-year retreat program. As community engagement lead, I coordinated our on-campus programming for leaders and participants to have a chance to connect beyond the retreats themselves.

DH: Do you have any “behind-the-scenes” anecdotes or funny stories you would like to share from working with Campus Ministry?

AG: It’s been an incredible time working with Campus Ministry! My favorite part of the job has been the opportunity to sit with the ESCAPE director Laura Mintel to brainstorm creative new ideas to engage the ESCAPE community. Not only is Laura an amazing person to talk to and listen to, but also sitting at her desk means being able to play with her many puzzles and handheld trinkets while chatting. It’s such a great time, because so many ideas come from these discussions, and I always come out of them feeling fulfilled and energized!

DH: Has working at Campus Ministry deepened your knowledge of your own faith or other faith traditions?

AG: Working at Campus Ministry has deepened my knowledge of other faith traditions and my relationship with faith. Although I do not identify with any particular faith, I have had the chance to learn so much about faith and how my friends in the Campus Ministry community interact with their own faiths. It’s such a beautiful community, and I’ve appreciated having the opportunity to be a part of it even though I don’t identify with any faith myself.

DH: Has working in a multi-faith context prepared you for your future professional career?

AG: I’ve learned so much from working in a multi-faith context, and I feel better equipped to engage with the world beyond Georgetown because of my experience here.

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Student employee spotlight: Katie Woodfin

Katie Woodfin, COL’19

As the Class of 2019 prepares to graduate this week, Campus Ministry would like to acknowledge the hard work of our student employees and their contributions to the mission of our department. 

Dustin Hartuv (COL’21), Campus Ministry staff writer, reached out to our 16 student employee graduands to ask them about their time with the department. He brings us this Q & A – the first in a short series of reflections – with Katie Woodfin, (COL’19).

DH: How long have you worked for Campus Ministry?

KW: Two years— Junior and Senior Year.

DH: What was your job at Campus Ministry?

KW: Student Coordinator for Catholic Retreats.

DH: Do you have any “behind-the-scenes” anecdotes or funny stories you would like to share from working with Campus Ministry?

KW: Often, while the retreatants are in small groups or individually reflecting, the student coordinator has time to spend with the retreat director and the chaplains present on that retreat. One of my favorite memories was spending time with Fr. Greg (on one of the many retreats we’ve been on together) as I convinced him that everyone has a “private laugh” and he tried to discover his own types of laughter. It’s one of the most special parts of a retreat— to get to know both peers and adults in a setting that is away from the classroom or formal meetings and to be able to laugh and joke and relax.

DH: Has working at Campus Ministry deepened your knowledge of your own faith or other faith traditions?

KW: Having the opportunity to go on each of the Catholic retreats for two years has been a wonderful experience in deepening my own faith. Having the ability to see others rejoice and get to know their own faith on a deeper level while on retreat has taught me so much. There’s some kind of magic combination of being with peers, being away from campus at the CCC, and getting a chance to be in a small group reflective setting that has allowed me to get to know my peers on a deeper level and to understand what my faith means to me.

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