Posts Tagged: blogs

What’s New in WordPress 3.9.1

As of June 27th, Georgetown Commons blogs and ePortfolios run on the latest version of WordPress. This video outlines the major changes: New WordPress 3.9 Smith from I for Ideas on Vimeo. Aside from the usual bug fixes, WordPress 3.9 “Smith” features a few significant improvements in the incorporation of multimedia in blog posts. Photo galleries in… Read more »

From the Archives: Resources on Incorporating Blogs & Twitter into Assignments

Deciding to incorporate blogs or Twitter into your course raises a number of questions that may seem daunting. How will you structure the assignment? How will you connect student work on Twitter or blogs to in-class discussions? As the professor, to what extent will you contribute to the blog or Twitter stream? How will you evaluate student work in these spaces – or will you grade it at all?

Social Pedagogies in the Chronicle

In a recent article in the Chronicle of Higher Education, Derek Bruff, acting director of the Center for Teaching at Vanderbilt University, discusses social pedagogies. He draws on work by Randy Bass and Heidi Elmendorf, as well as citing an example from GU professor Sarah Stiles (Sociology).

Doyle Course Explores History of Witches

Astrid Weigert (German) and her students don’t just think about witches on Halloween — they spend a semester examining the portrayal of witches in literature and film as well as the history of witches. As a Doyle Faculty Fellow, Astrid has redesigned the humanities and writing course to incorporate issues of inclusion and difference.

Resources for Developing Blog and Twitter Assignments

Deciding to incorporate blogs or Twitter into your course raises a number of questions that may seem daunting. How will you structure the assignment? How will you connect student work on Twitter or blogs to in-class discussions? As the professor, to what extent will you contribute to the blog or Twitter stream? How will you evaluate student work in these spaces – or will you grade it at all?

Maps Blog Creates a Collective Experience

While blogs have become a mainstream approach to document and share student comprehension and reflection, the undergraduate course The Contemporary African City, taught by Professor Rodney Collins, used WordPress (with a Google maps plugin) to curate and display information in a compellingly different way.