Microblogging

Microblogging involves the posting of short and frequent messages.

Twitter is a microblogging tool that intentionally limits messages to 140 characters or less. Twitter users "follow" other users in a basic form of social networking; however, these connections are generally driven by interest and utility rather than a desire to maintain interpersonal relationships. This focus on utility distinguishes Twitter from other social network sites such as Facebook or MySpace. On Twitter, users post a variety of content ranging from simple status updates to links to academic papers. Posts can be marked either public (the default) or private. Users experience Twitter through a stream of posts from the accounts they follow, and they adjust this stream—by following new accounts and/or unfollowing other accounts—to their taste. Yammer approximates Twitter but limits networks to people using the same domain name (e.g., georgetown.edu). CNDLS uses Yammer to share bits of information. Microblogging tools can bolster presence, meaning that participants feel as if other users are in the same space even though they are communicating via posted text.

Twitter in the classroom

Faculty are experimenting with all sorts of ways to incorporate Twitter, which was recently named the top learning tool of 2009 by the Centre for Learning and Performance Technologies, into academic settings. For example:

Microblogging involves the posting of short and frequent messages. Microblogging tools can bolster presence, meaning that participants feel as if other users are in the same space even though they are communicating via posted text.

Microblogging involves the posting of short and frequent messages.

Twitter is a microblogging tool that intentionally limits messages to 140 characters or less. Twitter users “follow” other users in a basic form of social networking; however, these connections are generally driven by interest and utility rather than a desire to maintain interpersonal relationships. This focus on utility distinguishes Twitter from other social network sites such as Facebook or MySpace.

On Twitter, users post a variety of content ranging from simple status updates to links to academic papers. Posts can be marked either public (the default) or private. Users experience Twitter through a stream of posts from the accounts they follow, and they adjust this stream—by following new accounts and/or unfollowing other accounts—to their taste.

Yammer approximates Twitter but limits networks to people using the same domain name (e.g., georgetown.edu). CNDLS uses Yammer to share bits of information.

Microblogging tools can bolster presence, meaning that participants feel as if other users are in the same space even though they are communicating via posted text.

Twitter in the classroom

Faculty are experimenting with all sorts of ways to incorporate Twitter, which was recently named the top learning tool of 2009 by the Centre for Learning and Performance Technologies, into academic settings. For example: