The Making of the MOOC: Georgetown joins edX with Globalization’s Winners and Losers: Challenges for Developed and Developing Countries

In this guest blog post, Globalization course teaching assistant Emily Cheung describes the exciting process of developing Georgetown's first massive open online course (MOOC), which will launch on October 1.

96 ounces. That’s 96 ounces of coffee at every MOOC filming, with all the fixings to satisfy even the pickiest of coffee drinkers: sugars (the blue, pink, and yellow packets), milks (2% and half-and-half), wooden stirrers, and napkins to wipe up any close calls near camera equipment.

Walking into  Healy Hall, the neo-Gothic landmark that dominates the Georgetown University skyline, I see Ryan, Alfred, and Barrinton setting up the cameras and microphones. Amir connects the umbrella to the backlight as Bailey deftly tucks the wire of the lavalier behind Dr. Moran’s tie. The lights warm and shine brighter as coffee brings everyone to life. Theresa, Joselyn, Yianna, Anna, Rosie, and I sit to review our notes, discuss tasks and to-dos, and coordinate our next working meeting. Filming begins and there’s an undeniable excitement and energy in the room—our MOOC launches in only nine weeks.

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INFX523-01 - Globalization’s Winners and Losers: Challenges for Developed and Developing Countries is Georgetown University’s first MOOC, bringing together faculty and staff from Georgetown’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship, Gelardin New Media Center, and Lauinger Library. This course gives students an opportunity to apply classical and modern trade theory to problems associated with economic development all over the world. Readings and discussions regarding industrial policy, foreign investment and national security, and effective supply chain management are unpacked and analyzed. The class challenges students to prescribe policy responses to spread the benefits of globalization more broadly and mitigate dislocations.

Georgetown’s partnership with edX is simply another way the University’s actions reflect its mission to educate and engage with the global community on important issues and problems. Following Georgetown’s long-standing tradition of quality education combined with new technologies and innovation, INFX523-01 engages global learners with problems Dr. Moran and his colleagues investigate and wrestle with everyday at Georgetown’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.

 This fall, pour yourself a cup of coffee and join us on this unprecedented adventure together.

In this guest blog post, Globalization course teaching assistant Emily Cheung describes the exciting process of developing Georgetown’s first massive open online course (MOOC), which will launch on October 1.

96 ounces. That’s 96 ounces of coffee at every MOOC filming, with all the fixings to satisfy even the pickiest of coffee drinkers: sugars (the blue, pink, and yellow packets), milks (2% and half-and-half), wooden stirrers, and napkins to wipe up any close calls near camera equipment.

Walking into  Healy Hall, the neo-Gothic landmark that dominates the Georgetown University skyline, I see Ryan, Alfred, and Barrinton setting up the cameras and microphones. Amir connects the umbrella to the backlight as Bailey deftly tucks the wire of the lavalier behind Dr. Moran’s tie. The lights warm and shine brighter as coffee brings everyone to life. Theresa, Joselyn, Yianna, Anna, Rosie, and I sit to review our notes, discuss tasks and to-dos, and coordinate our next working meeting. Filming begins and there’s an undeniable excitement and energy in the room—our MOOC launches in only nine weeks.

blog photo 2

INFX523-01 – Globalization’s Winners and Losers: Challenges for Developed and Developing Countries is Georgetown University’s first MOOC, bringing together faculty and staff from Georgetown’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service, Center for New Designs in Learning and Scholarship, Gelardin New Media Center, and Lauinger Library. This course gives students an opportunity to apply classical and modern trade theory to problems associated with economic development all over the world. Readings and discussions regarding industrial policy, foreign investment and national security, and effective supply chain management are unpacked and analyzed. The class challenges students to prescribe policy responses to spread the benefits of globalization more broadly and mitigate dislocations.

Georgetown’s partnership with edX is simply another way the University’s actions reflect its mission to educate and engage with the global community on important issues and problems. Following Georgetown’s long-standing tradition of quality education combined with new technologies and innovation, INFX523-01 engages global learners with problems Dr. Moran and his colleagues investigate and wrestle with everyday at Georgetown’s Edmund A. Walsh School of Foreign Service.

 This fall, pour yourself a cup of coffee and join us on this unprecedented adventure together.