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Archive for the ‘Industrial Revolution’ Category

For our session this week, we will discuss issues of gender, the family, and women’s (dis)empowerment during the era of high bourgeois culture. The industrialized and fully capitalist societies in northwestern Europe (primarily Britain, France, the low countries, Germany, Scandinavian countries) by the mid to late 19th century were basking in the confidence of increasingly […]

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Here is a link to the story I mentioned tonight, the Pullman strike. Professor Loomis is great on labor issues; you can explore the site to find other links to his ‘this day in labor history’ series. It can be kind of crazy to encounter stuff like this for the first time — the military, […]

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So now let’s get to the specter…. Utopian socialism had apparently failed. So had the liberals’ attempts in an array of European countries to establish liberal democracies. Both those ideas would still be tried for a long time, but repeated failure had hardened many peoples’ hearts against them. They wanted more direct action. That’s when […]

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We began our discussion of the Industrial Revolution with one foot still in the past:  Shelley’s romantic (or anti-romantic) writings. But the Revolution was above all a time of looking forward to new ways of making things, new forms of social organization, and new problems to face. We now come fully into the age of […]

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This week, we start the first of a several part series on the industrial revolution. We begin to leave behind the semi-pastoral world seen at the end of the 18th century, and start to progress to the mechanical, disconcerting, modernist age. For our readings and lectures, we will start with the brute facts of the […]

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