Biblioteca : Latin American and Iberian Resources at Georgetown

Entries categorized as ‘resources’

Quick post: Exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art; wrapping up the semester

November 9, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Hi everyone. Yes, I was overdue for a post, but it’s busier than usual the last few weeks, and then last week I had some minor surgery on my right foot. All is well and I’m back in business.

For today, just a quick post for anyone heading up to NYC soon. My friend James Doyle is assistant curator in the Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and he has helped curate this exhibition with the chief curator, Joanne Pillsbury, Design for Eternity: Architectural Models from the Ancient Americas. You can read more about the models in blog posts from the museum here (there are only two at the moment, since it’s a new exhibition) and information about visiting the Met here.

Second, If there are any Georgetown faculty or students reading this, let me know how I can help you finish up the rest of the semester. This is the time when many students are at least starting preliminary work on their final papers. Professors, let me know if I can come to your class for a presentation on library resources (as specific or as general as you’d like, and for as short or as you’d like), and students, feel free to meet with me in person for research assistance, and or even chat via my research guides for help. If I’m logged into chat (and I’m not right now because I’m writing this!) a chat box will appear. I actually “met” with a student last week this way while I was out with my foot and it worked well. My e-mail is mrs249[at]

Have a great week! More soon.

Categories: resources

SciELO indexed in Web of Science (which is much more than science!)

October 9, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Happy Friday! I can tell by the looks of the students’ faces in the library that midterm exams are on the horizon, if they haven’t already ended for some. Happily there is a three-day weekend in just a matter of hours, so we can all have a breather.

Maybe this is old news in the Latin American/Lusophone Studies library world, but today I learned that the database Web of Knowledge/Web of Science (as we call it in our database list) indexes the Brazilian open source journal platform SciELO. If you work in the humanities or social sciences, have no fear of that word “Science”! Through the Web of Science, I was able to find some excellent articles in these areas as well.

First, to limit your search to SciELO, just click on the arrow next to where it says “All Databases” and choose SciELO. That’s it! To test the limits of “science,” I searched “literatura colonial” and ended up with about 70 article hits. One advantage of searching in Web of Science is that recently added citation and usage counts to its platform, and these will gradually be added as they appear in other bibliographies over time. If you create an account (upper right under Sign In), you can create and save bibliographies, search alerts, and other time-saving features.

The SciELO website is still a good place to go for a broader approach, such as looking at journals from a particular country or academic field. I recommend bookmarking and using both for different reasons; sometimes researchers need traditional keyword searching, and other times, it’s helpful to look at broader trends.

Let me know if you have any further questions or issues with either version of SciELO. I won’t be posting next week because I’ll be visiting family in Illinois, but I’ll make a post the following Thursday while I’m on the way up to a meeting in New Haven, LANE. Have a good weekend and thanks for reading.

Categories: resources

Hello again! And a news resource

October 2, 2015 · Leave a Comment

¡Hola de nuevo! As I recently wrote, I recently decided to continue blogging here. I have set aside time every two weeks to write something new. I am also thinking of starting blogs for my other liaison areas, Italian and Western European Studies, but, well, baby steps for now. While on the surface it may seem easy to keep up a blog, over time the maintenance and focus of the blog can change and become increasingly complicated. However, I enjoy writing these posts, and it helps me to step back a bit and reflect on my work. And I hope it helps inform you as well!

Today I want to focus on a great news resource that we have here at Georgetown, Press Display. This is a great way to get current news and information from many countries. The opening screen lists a lot of current events happening from a wide variety of sources, but on the left you will see a long list of countries that you can link to. Right now I’m looking at today’s front page of the Paraguayan newspaper Última hora, for example. Using the navigation bar at the bottom, I can “read” it just as if it were the newspaper itself. You can zoom in by clicking the page, and you can crop and print particular articles by hovering over the printer icon. It also works well on both phones and tablets. Keep in mind that if you are off-campus, you will be asked to log in with your NetID and password to gain access.

As you go through the titles from each country, you’ll definitely come across a few that are more about pop culture or hobbies (such as Todo perros from Spain) rather than serious news, but I also must say that even looking at these is a great way to practice your Spanish or Portuguese (or, if you’re from that country, a way to keep up with everything going on there!) If you need to know about current events, trends in politics, fashion, pop culture, or just more about the daily life of a particular place, Press Display is a great place to start.

Direct link to Press Display:

Categories: journals · news · online · resources
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Blog news!

September 29, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Hi everyone,

I’m not sure who is reading this anymore, but I recently decided to go ahead and revive this blog! The entries will probably be short and sweet for the most part, and will come more often. I’ve set aside time on my schedule to write these. The first official new post will be this Friday. ¡Olé!

Categories: resources

Biblioteca Palafoxiana online catalog, Colegio de México digital collections, blog news

February 11, 2015 · Leave a Comment


Happy Wednesday. I recently received notice that the Biblioteca Palafoxiana’s catalog is online. You can search it here. While it is not a digital library, nonetheless it is helpful to see the holdings of what many consider to be the first library in America. Full link:

I did find a way to find some digitized versions of books that are in the Biblioteca Palafoxiana, through the cooperative e-book platform Primeros Libros (which I will adding to my relevant research guides shortly.) The list of digitized books in the BP is here.

While I was looking at various webpages for this post, I happened to come across the Colegio de Mexico’s list of digital collections. There is a some great stuff in there in a variety of subject areas, and most of the collections are publicly available (Colegio-only resources are marked with CM.) Link for this is here.

Finally, while I will continue to post on this blog when I can for the remainder of the semester, I am thinking about retiring it in the fall, or at least slowing it down a bit. Blogs take a great deal of time to write, edit, and maintain, and in the interest of efficiency (THE word of our age, I think), I am thinking about going the social media route, if only to send out news much faster. However, I also like this format exactly because of its length; the ability to be clear and complete is something becoming rarer and rarer these days. I will likely continue it somewhere in the middle; blogging for the bigger news (a new paid resource, conference news, etc.) and leaving quick and helpful tips and more general/public resources to Facebook and/or Twitter. More to come! Thanks for reading.

Categories: meta · online · research help · resources
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“Literatura afro e indígena para leer y descargar gratuitamente” (Banco de la República, Colombia)

December 22, 2014 · Leave a Comment

This is the last post of 2014! Tomorrow I head to Illinois and then Pennsylvania for the holidays. It’s been quite a year. I was hoping to post from the Feria Internacional del Libro, but it was just too busy! It was a great time, though, and I got some good stuff that will be hitting the shelves over the next few months.

I just found out about this via the SALALM Facebook page. The Banco de la República in Colombia is offering two new series of books for free, one on indigenous Colombians, and the other on Afro-Colombian literature. The press release is here, and I found both collections on this page within the digital library of the Biblioteca Luis Ángel Arango.

In the new year, I will see about the possibility of adding these pages to GEORGE, but online collections are wily and can be tricky to keep track of. Content and URLs often change over time, for example, and maintaining the catalog record in tandem requires a good amount of work, especially if you’re dealing with many different pages across different subject areas. The “Biblioteca Virtual” is organized very well, however, and after a few clicks, it’s pretty easy to navigate. Also note that you can join their e-mail list to receive updates on the website as well as other cultural activities sponsored by the Banco.

More to come in 2015! Many thanks for reading this! Happy holidays, and peace and happiness in the new year.

Categories: online · resources
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Researching religion in Latin America

November 24, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Hi everyone. Well, I meant to write a post right after my previous post, but, work happened! I am heading to Mexico on Saturday for the Feria Internacional del Libro, and I’ll make sure I write a post from there.

Today my colleague Amy Phillips and I helped a student who was researching Judaism and Jews in Ecuador, and she showed me a great source for Jewish Studies, RAMBI. Check out her research guide for Hebrew & Jewish Studies to help you find more resources about this often-overlooked culture in Latin America.

Given Georgetown’s Catholic affiliation, many librarians here collect quite a few books and other resources to research religions around the world. I just did a quick search on general books about religion in Latin America, with these results.

Besides my own guides on Latin American Studies, there are also other research guides that may be handy. Besides obvious ones like Theology & Religions or Asian Religions, guides on sociology, education, and other related topics may also be useful.

Side note: the Library of Congress Hispanic Reading Room has digitized many books in Ladino, and here they are.

Happy Thanksgiving if you celebrate it, and enjoy the time off/time to get caught up! :-) Thank you for reading.

Categories: online · research help · resources
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La saga Fernández-Shaw y el teatro lírico (Fundación Juan March)

November 7, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Hi everyone. Well, it is well over halfway through the semester, and I realized that I haven’t blogged in a very long time! It has been a busy time, but mostly good. To make up for it, today I’ll write two posts!

This first post is about a new online archive of Spain’s Fernández-Shaw family, which created over 100 works of various genres musical theater (zarzuelas, sainetes, operas, etc.) The archive was done and is hosted by the Fundación Juan March, and contains nearly 5000 individual documents divided by composer (Carlos, the father, and his sons Guillermo and Rafael.) Even if your research is not about musical theater itself, the archive is an excellent reflection of one of Spain’s most turbulent centuries. The family also traveled extensively throughout the Western Hemisphere, and documents like this one make for fascinating study if your interests fall in the Transatlantic realm.

The archive is searchable by index, but there doesn’t seem to be any OCR. Nonetheless, the archive appears to be well-indexed and searches worked well, and metadata is extremely thorough. You can narrow results from the list on the left. Finally, to see a whole document, click on “Ver documento” and not the image. Most images also seem to be available in .pdf.

Here is the direct link to the archive is here:

Second post in a little bit! Happy Friday.

Categories: online · resources
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Hello and some other stuff!

August 25, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Hello hello. It’s been quite awhile since I posted, but I decided to take a break from the blog and try to keep this going mostly through the regular academic year. Classes start in two days, so you’ll start seeing more posts here soon. I think about two per month is good without making me too busy.

If you’re new to Georgetown this year, welcome! Feel free to get in touch with me about any question about the library; if I can’t answer it, I can certainly find the person who can. My e-mail is I’ll be holding quite a few research sessions this fall, so it’s likely you’ll see me around ICC a good amount. Please say hello!

Completely off the topic from all of this, I randomly found this recorded discussion from the Center for the Art of Translation in San Francisco about the complexities of translating Roberto Bolaño. The discussion features the translator Natasha Wimmer and the writer Daniel Alarcón, and is here.

Speaking of translation, I have been developing my own interest in the subject in recent years, and here at Lauinger we have over 700 titles on the subject. I’m going to check out a few titles myself right now!

Best of luck with the semester!

Categories: audio · introduction · meta · online · resources
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World Cup online collection and exhibit

June 17, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Hi there, I hope you are staying cool on this very, very hot day. I walked to Saxby’s during lunch to grab a sandwich, and well, I don’t think I want to leave the building again until at least 10 PM.

Early today, Luis González, my counterpart at Indiana University, sent out an e-mail about an online collection and related exhibits to the SALALM listserv. They are from the Museu do Futebol in São Paulo and are housed on Google’s “Cultural Institute” platform.

Pay special attention to the options available in the upper left and right corners, they can refine and reorganize the display very quickly; I love that you just have to click to refine the results, although there is also a search option as well. I don’t believe the metadata is quite complete yet, but with just under 400 items, browsing is still manageable for the moment.

The site is here, and is really a great look into the history of futebol. Complete link:

PS: I did a quick search on “World Cup” in GEORGE, and we definitely have some interesting titles about the tournament!

Categories: online · resources
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