Biblioteca : Latin American and Iberian Resources at Georgetown

Entries categorized as ‘research help’

Style!

April 19, 2016 · Leave a Comment

The other day at the reference desk, a student asked about how to cite images that she found online, but originally appeared in an early 20th-century British newspaper. Many times the citations and bibliography can be just as confounding as writing the paper itself! As the semester starts to wind down, I thought I’d highlight a few of them and provide some tips to make things easier.

There are several different style guides, the chief ones being Chicago, Turabian, MLA (Modern Language Assocation), APA (American Psychological Assocation), AMA (American Medical Assocation), CSE (Council of Science Editors), and ACS (American Chemical Society.)

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Why are there so many different styles? Basically each style highlights a different aspect of a particular bibliographical source, depending on the field. Science, for example, tends to focus more on journal articles instead of monographs, which is more common in the humanities, and its citation style tends to focus on the article itself, and not the authors.  Science articles often have many coauthors, hence they are abbreviated to make the entry shorter and more concise.

Humanities sources tend to be written by a single person (although I think this may be starting to change, but that’s a topic for another post.) Check out some examples of MLA style here, and you’ll quickly see it is a bit less concise than CSE style, and both the authors/contributors and the work are generally given equal emphasis.

Being exact with citation and bibliographical style is important because it was what lends your work its veracity. A poorly constructed citation entry will make the reader think you did not actually consult the source, or, at a minimum, make it very difficult for the reader to find. This is the key idea while writing these; the reader should be able to find the source given the information in the citation or entry.

At Lauinger we do have a few tools to you help you sort through the different styles (you can navigate to the link page from the Research link at the top, then click on Citations Tools.) Most citations/entries are quite straightforward, but you may need to piece together different kinds of entries for something like the situation I mentioned at the start of this post.

Feel free to contact any librarian for any help you may need for this. I actually love making bibliographies, they’re kind of like putting together a little skeleton for your paper…but I guess that’s one reason why I became a librarian! Have a good week and thanks for reading.

Categories: research help · resources
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New semester and news about a Bolaño novel

January 28, 2016 · Leave a Comment

Greetings from Lau! I hope you have been coping with the snow ok. Very, very, gradually the city is showing signs of improvement, and I look forward to when I won’t need my giant boots again. I grew up in central Illinois and got my BA in Minneapolis-St. Paul, so this weather isn’t completely foreign to me, but I’m definitely not used to it anymore, either!

First, let me know about any of your research needs and, if you teach, please let me know if you need any kind of library instruction. I welcome individual meetings (in-person or via the chat on my research guides), group meetings for a specific project, e-mail, in-class instruction, or really any way that is the most convenient for you. I have begun teleworking on Mondays, but thanks to technology, I can certainly be in touch! If, however, you do need me to come in on Monday for a class or some other kind of presentation, I can simply change my telework day to accommodate this.

Second, I just read that Roberto Bolaño’s last novel, 2666, is being adapted into a play at the Goodman Theater in Chicago. It will be quite interesting to see how this turns out, although I am hopeful as the Goodman does great work. We have a fair amount about Bolaño and his work in Lauinger, and there always seems to be more. In 2013, the Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona held an exhibition based on his archives, and much of its website is still active. And yes, we have the exhibition catalog right here in Lau!

Have a great semester. When I was in school, I often found the spring semester to be more grueling than the fall one; the end is in sight but there’s still a bit a hurdle to go. Let me know if there’s any way the library can make your life a little easier!

Categories: instruction · news · research guides · research help
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Quick post: Exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art; wrapping up the semester

November 9, 2015 · Leave a Comment

Hi everyone. Yes, I was overdue for a post, but it’s busier than usual the last few weeks, and then last week I had some minor surgery on my right foot. All is well and I’m back in business.

For today, just a quick post for anyone heading up to NYC soon. My friend James Doyle is assistant curator in the Department of the Arts of Africa, Oceania, and the Americas at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and he has helped curate this exhibition with the chief curator, Joanne Pillsbury, Design for Eternity: Architectural Models from the Ancient Americas. You can read more about the models in blog posts from the museum here (there are only two at the moment, since it’s a new exhibition) and information about visiting the Met here.

Second, If there are any Georgetown faculty or students reading this, let me know how I can help you finish up the rest of the semester. This is the time when many students are at least starting preliminary work on their final papers. Professors, let me know if I can come to your class for a presentation on library resources (as specific or as general as you’d like, and for as short or as you’d like), and students, feel free to meet with me in person for research assistance, and or even chat via my research guides for help. If I’m logged into chat (and I’m not right now because I’m writing this!) a chat box will appear. I actually “met” with a student last week this way while I was out with my foot and it worked well. My e-mail is mrs249[at]georgetown.edu

Have a great week! More soon.

Categories: events · instruction · research help · resources
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Biblioteca Palafoxiana online catalog, Colegio de México digital collections, blog news

February 11, 2015 · Leave a Comment

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Happy Wednesday. I recently received notice that the Biblioteca Palafoxiana’s catalog is online. You can search it here. While it is not a digital library, nonetheless it is helpful to see the holdings of what many consider to be the first library in America. Full link: http://biblioteca.colmex.mx/palafoxiana/

I did find a way to find some digitized versions of books that are in the Biblioteca Palafoxiana, through the cooperative e-book platform Primeros Libros (which I will adding to my relevant research guides shortly.) The list of digitized books in the BP is here.

While I was looking at various webpages for this post, I happened to come across the Colegio de Mexico’s list of digital collections. There is a some great stuff in there in a variety of subject areas, and most of the collections are publicly available (Colegio-only resources are marked with CM.) Link for this is here.

Finally, while I will continue to post on this blog when I can for the remainder of the semester, I am thinking about retiring it in the fall, or at least slowing it down a bit. Blogs take a great deal of time to write, edit, and maintain, and in the interest of efficiency (THE word of our age, I think), I am thinking about going the social media route, if only to send out news much faster. However, I also like this format exactly because of its length; the ability to be clear and complete is something becoming rarer and rarer these days. I will likely continue it somewhere in the middle; blogging for the bigger news (a new paid resource, conference news, etc.) and leaving quick and helpful tips and more general/public resources to Facebook and/or Twitter. More to come! Thanks for reading.

Categories: meta · online · research help · resources
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Researching religion in Latin America

November 24, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Hi everyone. Well, I meant to write a post right after my previous post, but, work happened! I am heading to Mexico on Saturday for the Feria Internacional del Libro, and I’ll make sure I write a post from there.

Today my colleague Amy Phillips and I helped a student who was researching Judaism and Jews in Ecuador, and she showed me a great source for Jewish Studies, RAMBI. Check out her research guide for Hebrew & Jewish Studies to help you find more resources about this often-overlooked culture in Latin America.

Given Georgetown’s Catholic affiliation, many librarians here collect quite a few books and other resources to research religions around the world. I just did a quick search on general books about religion in Latin America, with these results.

Besides my own guides on Latin American Studies, there are also other research guides that may be handy. Besides obvious ones like Theology & Religions or Asian Religions, guides on sociology, education, and other related topics may also be useful.

Side note: the Library of Congress Hispanic Reading Room has digitized many books in Ladino, and here they are.

Happy Thanksgiving if you celebrate it, and enjoy the time off/time to get caught up! 🙂 Thank you for reading.

Categories: online · research help · resources
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Which journals are in which databases?

June 23, 2014 · Leave a Comment

periodicals

With the ever-increasing number of full-text journals available in our databases, it can be frustrating to simply browse new issues of your favorite ones. It’s very easy to find the print copies in the stacks and just leaf through them, and as a semi-Luddite myself, nothing beats sitting and relaxing with something that exists in the actual world. But have no fear, with just one extra step, you can find these journals in the databases as well, and then simply “leaf” through them online.

The key is the switch the main search box on the library web page to “Journals.” You can find journals in the catalog, but many times the rather generic names can make for a lot of similar and therefore confusing entries*. However, the “Journals” search is much more direct, and the results will lead you directly to the databases in which there is full-text availability. For example, Bulletin of Spanish Studies is available in a few different databases (click to enlarge):

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Once you’re in a particular database, you can usually browse by year, and then drill down to particular issues from there. In addition, you can often receive an e-mail or RSS notifications for when the latest issue is available; these options are often under links titled “Share” or something similar. Also note that you can still get to the catalog record in GEORGE.

*There’s also a history of when new catalog records were created for serials, hence it may seem that there is some duplication of records for the same title. If you really want to get technical, have a look at the latest rules (.doc) on this issue!

Categories: journals · research help · searching tips

Special Collections Research Center (SCRC)

May 17, 2012 · Leave a Comment

Georgetown’s Special Collections Research Center is on the top floor of Lauinger, and is open to anyone who wishes to use the materials housed there. For Latin American and Iberian materials, it can be invaluable for your research, especially (but not only) if you are in need of primary resources. I highly recommend that you consider it in your research strategy, you may be surprised by what useful sources you find there.

In a previous post I discussed how to use search limits in GEORGE to find films. It is not so different to find things in the Special Collections Research Center. Using the advanced GEORGE search (here), use the drop-down box under “Location” to limit the search to “LAU Special Coll.”

One great thing about special collections, besides simply looking through cool stuff, is that they have a wide variety of materials. For example, start by putting “Latin America” in the search box, limit the location, and then material type “Maps & Atlases.” There are two results, one of which dates from 1758, and the other appears to be a fancy facsimile edition of Columbus’s diaries that includes many maps. So, few results sometimes does not mean bad results!

Again, the SCRC’s webpage is here. Feel free to get in touch with anyone there if you would like further assistance, they will be more than happy to help you. Students, faculty, and outside researchers are all welcome.

Categories: research help · resources · searching tips
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Things for fall

April 25, 2012 · Leave a Comment

It may seem odd to think about the fall semester already when summer is right around the corner, but I wanted to let you know ahead of time some things I can provide for faculty and students as the next semester begins.

Instruction: If you are a professor, I’d be happy to either come to your classroom or hold a research instruction session here at Lauinger. I can take the entire time or as little as 10 minutes to present a brief overview. I can also hold two shorter sessions over the course of the semester; the one at the start would be for presenting the basics of research at Georgetown, and the second would be for helping students if they are stuck and need other suggestions, and/or to start putting together their final bibliography. If you are a student, see if your professor would be interested in this. I realize class time is valuable, but even a few minutes can help students a great deal with their research projects. You can request an instruction session here.

Research consultations: Anyone, faculty, student, outside researchers, etc., can make an appointment with me to go over resources to help with her or his research. It doesn’t have to be for a paper or a presentation, either; for example, I’d be happy to help you set up RSS feeds to know when new titles in your specialty arrive at the library, searching for primary resources in general, and so on. Simply e-mail me at mrs249@georgetown.edu to get started.

Research guides: I am more than happy to make research guides for anything you are working on, be it a class you are teaching, a informal working group on a specific topic, or perhaps background information on a conference that is going to be held on campus. I have several research guides already (they are here), and over the course of the summer, I will be creating new ones specifically for Spanish peninsular literature, Latin American history, Spanish linguistics, Spanish American literature, Catalan literature, and literature and linguistics in Portuguese. Please let me know if you would like a research guide as soon as you can; just drop a line at mrs249@georgetown.edu and I’ll be in touch.

Most importantly, please just drop a line if you have any questions, issues, etc. Even if I am unable to help you (say with an interlibrary loan problem), I can get you to the right people to resolve it. Good luck with the rest of the semester and thanks for reading.

Categories: instruction · research guides · research help
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