How to Be A Better Artist

art promo video

Studying art requires dedicated studio time–there’s no getting around it. But whether you’re taking introductory painting or advanced photography, looking at the work of other artists, reading about their processes and technique, and discovering new styles is as important as logging studio time.  In the Washington, DC area we’re fortunate to have dozens of museums and galleries at which to see art in the flesh. We also have a fantastic library system for art research.

If spending time in the library doesn’t seem very arty, consider the above video, created by the Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design (AICAD).  These artists agree that art doesn’t happen in a vacuum–an artist needs to blend experiences and abilities with ideas, styles, and influences from the world.  And guess what? There’s a book for that.

Interior of The Fine art library, one of the NTNU University Library's departments

Interior of The Fine art library, one of the NTNU University Library’s departments

Not sure where to start? Try the advice of Carole Caroompas, an artist and faculty member at the Otis School of Art and Design, “I say just walk into the library, go down an aisle, turn and point your finger and pull  the book out that’s in front of you.”

Here’s another place to start. AICAD is offering an introduction to Information Literacy for Art and Design Students in a free, massive online open course (oft-called a MOOC, which is not actually a wild animal or something British) , and it starts today.aicad

This class, run in collaboration by librarians from the Otis College of Art and Design and the Maryland Institute College of Art, is the first of its kind. I suggest you get in on the ground level and take your info-savvy skills–and by association your art chops–to the next level. I’ll see you there!

Information Literacy for Art and Design Students

Association of Independent Colleges of Art and Design

Oct 21, 2013 to Nov 25, 2013
Cost per enrollment: Free

 

Be Sociable, Share!
This entry was posted in Academics, Art Librarianship, Artistic Process, Library Resources, Professional Development, Source Material for Artists and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.